Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society

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Rating: 4.0

Average rating from 2 reviews.

(4.0 out of 5, based on 2 reviews)

63 ELM STREETSALISBURY, MA 01952
978-462-0760
Hours: Closed Sundays and Mondays, T & Th 2-8pm, W & F, 2-6pm and Sat. 11-4pm

1516 miles away
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A non-profit, no-kill feline rescue and shelter. Founded in 1992 to help the feral cat population on the water front in Newburyport. The shelter has an adoption program, barn program, spay/neuter program for feral cats, low-cost s/n program, microchipping program. Cats that come to MRFRS are here until they find their forever home.

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Reader's Reviews (2)
Kate K.
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Rating: 5

Love it!

posted 5 years ago

I adopted my kitten Linus (formerly named Jay) from MRFRS and the staff were great! They were very helpful and I loved how all the cats were out of their cages. You didn't have to fill out an application just to pet them which was nice. They did a check in a month after we adopted Linus to see how things were going which I have never gotten from other shelters. I certainly plan to adopt another kitty from there sometime in the future.

Pros: The cats roam free!

Cons: Traffic and parking

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Rosebud2488
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Rating: 3

My experience

posted 6 years ago

First I want to start off by saying in general I feel that animal shelters do a great job, especially faced with the thousands and maybe millions of unwanted pets a year.

My experience with MRFRS (which is a no-kill shelter) was in 2002, I had to give away a cat and called them. They told me that they would put me on the waiting list and call me when they had an opening. I waited. I got lucky and was able to keep my cat. In fact I still have her today. I did recieve a call from MRFRS a year later asking if I still needed to give up my cat.

I understand that they are overcrowded with cats and in this case I am grateful since the waiting actually resulted in me being able to keep my cat. Which I am thankful for everyday. But what about those who don't get that lucky and have to give up their cat in a short period of time. Waiting a year would result in their cat being taken to another shelter that may not be no-kill. Which brings me to my second point.

I understand that shelters have to charge an adoption fee to keep going, I have no problem with this since it helps weed out those that may not truly be commited to caring for a pet. But they are way too strict with their adoption rules. If they really want to find homes for unwanted pets, ease up on the rules a bit so potential adoptive pet owners won't get discouraged and go to a pet store where they can just give the clerk the money and walk away with a pet. I know several people who have done this after being turned away from shelter after shelter for silly reasons like having no park near their home to walk the dog, or only have a studio apartment. Also for not having a fence around their yard or having no yard at all. These are silly reasons since you can walk your dog down any street. and cats can be kept in doors and be very happy living in a studio apartment.

I know that shelters want the pets to go to good homes but the most important things are ... does the potential pet owner have their landlords permission to have the pet, or do they own their own home, will they take the pet to the vet, do they know what the pet needs as far as food and housing, and can they afford to pay for all the pets needs, like food and vet visits. Some of the questions they ask are just not relevent. Asking someone if the pets they had as a child were taken to the vet regulary just doesn't really make a difference because as a child they had no control over whether or not their parents took the family pet to the vet. Asking if the family plans on taking vacations of a week or more is none of the shelters business, many pet owners take vacations and either take their pets with them, leave them with a friend or family member or board them.

In conclusion, I just want to say, shelters keep up the good work but review the questions you ask and then ask yourself is this truly relevent, should I deny an adoption because the family will be taking a trip to Disneyland during the summer.



Pros: find great homes for cats

Cons: if you need to give up a cat, the waiting list is very long.

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