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Article:

Sat, Nov 10 | By Matt Van Hoven | 381

A report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 14 percent of Americans are infected with Toxocara – a parasite commonly known as the round worm. The disease is zoonotic – which means you can get it from… more ›

Round worms pose health risk, CDC says
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Jaimee123
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Jaimee123
6 years ago

YUCK !!!

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Gail
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Gail
6 years ago

This falls under the category of information I just really did not want to know tonight.

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Paige
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Paige
6 years ago

To avoid getting them from your pet, make sure your pets are wormed. And always was your hands after cleaning the litter box.

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Mary G.
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Mary G.
6 years ago

This article leaves too many questions and may cause unnecessary fears--opens up a can of worms if you will. The roundworms are "transferred through dog and cat fecal matter", OK, but how? How does the dog or cat become infected with the parasite. Personally I am not going to begin treating my animals with yet another medication until I know a lot more.

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Linda W.
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Linda W.
6 years ago

Okay. This is overkill. I have my cats and dogs tested for worm every year and they have never been found to have round worms. Once a month treatment or even testing is just more than you need, at least in my area. All these additional tests and treatments just make it costlier to keep a pet and I would wonder about treating my pet with yet another pest killer. Of course there is the claim by Interceptor that their heartworm preventative also kills the larval form of all other worms so that covers you anyway.

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collyn f.
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collyn f.
6 years ago

i'm glad we know this now... before it gets out of hand!!!

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Jamie
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Jamie
6 years ago

Wash - wash -wash your hands.

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Theresa
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Theresa
6 years ago

Stress the washing of hands, CONSTANTLY!

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Shirley B.
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Shirley B.
6 years ago

No children in my house. My dog gets regular checkups. Does that mean she is safe? The article is not clear to me.

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Tami T.
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Tami T.
6 years ago

Ack!

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Jenn
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Jenn
6 years ago

That's nasty.

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karen
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karen
6 years ago

article is interesting, however i read another article that says that even after cleaning up poo in your yard these organisms remain for quite some time. definitely something to keep in mind with children playing in yards.

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Felicia
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Felicia
6 years ago

people need to learn to wash their hands

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dana R.
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dana R.
6 years ago

And this was news? Talk about obvious!

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Katrina  J.
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Katrina J.
7 years ago

roundworms,yuck

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Dee
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Dee
7 years ago

Cant repeat the precautions too often. . . handwash, handwash, handwash.

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Slickabrina
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Slickabrina
7 years ago

Interesting

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donna r.
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donna r.
7 years ago

good info

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Bigertrain62
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Bigertrain62
7 years ago

get meds

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Maxinerauh
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Maxinerauh
7 years ago

oh no!! this is really scary- i really hope the treatments work and keep away these worms

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Manydogs
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Manydogs
7 years ago

Can the family doctor check my kids for worms? The joys our pets bring my children , they are still well worth the risk.

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LouAnne
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LouAnne
7 years ago

Is there any risk for medicating your animals this frequently?

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Philter
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Philter
7 years ago

Dang. I guess I should stop playing with my pets' fecal matter.

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Getta S.
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Getta S.
7 years ago

Keep yards and litter boxes cleaned.Always wash hands after doing such jobs.Keep animals worm free as possible,there are all sorts of natural wormers for animals as well as humans.There are also several nature things you can put onto your yards to help keep unwanted infestsations of worm etc. Check out some nature resources thru the internet or ask your local health food/medicine stores.

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PurplePoe
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PurplePoe
7 years ago

Although a little gross, as a shelter worker I can say I'm not all that surprised.

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Works4theanimals
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Works4theanimals
7 years ago

After reading this story I washed my hands.

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Jen22
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Jen22
7 years ago

Any one who gets a new puppy or kitten should wash their hands after they pick up feces. People need to make sure their childern's hands are clean after handling pets before they eat. Also a good iea is if your child has a sand box outside make sure you have a cover on it because cas thinks its a ig litter box for them. And a comment was made at the first of this discussion about pin worms. dogs and cats don't get pin worms thats a tapeworm they are probably seeing. And thats a totally different kind of worm species.

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Nicoleyoley21
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Nicoleyoley21
7 years ago

yuck yuck yuck!

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Tammyg
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Tammyg
7 years ago

Excellent suport of good hand washing

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JAN T.
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JAN T.
7 years ago

THIS IS GREAT INFORMATION TO KNOW. THIS WOULD BE A GOOD SUBJECT TO HAVE PUT IN THE PAPER OR ON THE NEWS.

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Einstein4614
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Einstein4614
7 years ago

I think you can get worms from anybody who's been around them. My sister got ring worm, Because i work with it. But i have not gotten it.

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shelia s.
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shelia s.
7 years ago

These worms are creepy! I would say practice great hygeine with not only yourself but your pet too!

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Sarahbell
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Sarahbell
7 years ago

Can you test your pets to see if they are carriers?

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Local3
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Local3
7 years ago

That's really nasty! I think I'll give the vet a call to see if he recommends any extra doses of de-wormer.

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Fernando A.
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Fernando A.
7 years ago

This is not new but as most people still don't know the risks it is worth reminding people.

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JoAnne S.
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JoAnne S.
7 years ago

If you take your dog for a walk, whether on a leash or not, you are exposing your pet to parasites. If your dog stops to sniff another dog's poop, and that poop has parasite eggs in it, then your dog is at risk. The eggs are inhaled thru the nose, and hatch in the digestive system. If your dog, or cat, steps in infested poop, then they are at risk. The best medicine is preventative. Once a month wormers, such as heartguard, or interceptor, will prevent not only heartworm, but other parasites as well, such as round worms, hook worms and whip worms. Most people will say their pet does not have worms, just because they can't see the worm. The vet checks a stool sample for microscopic eggs. If the pet has the eggs, it has the worm.
Most parasites are zoonotic - passed from animal to human.
Keep your hands away from your face! :)

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Rememberingromeo
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Rememberingromeo
7 years ago

Thanks for your discussion. I really want to do more extensive reading about animal diseases and such since I plan to have a long "career'' volunteering at shelters. I really am not as well informed as I should be.

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SarahO
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SarahO
7 years ago

Gross! Funny thing is we live with disgusting parasites on a daily basis. I wouldn't want to see anyones pillow under a microscope think of all the mites, yuck!

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Furls
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Furls
7 years ago

Good information, but YUCK!

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RaeRad34
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RaeRad34
7 years ago

hm, thats always good to know. Worms are really gross!

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Ahughes
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Ahughes
7 years ago

The Tv show HOUSE actually ran an episode related to this. The child was having crazy symptoms, couldn't speak and drew waht he saw. They were worms that had traveled to his eyes after having played in a sandbox where racoon fecal matter was later found.

Crazy huh!!!

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Cmdemeo
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Cmdemeo
7 years ago

Some topicals already protect against round worms. People just need to be cautious when it comes to their environment. Wash your hands and have your kids wash their hands. There are so many anti-bacterial and disinfecting agents around now that all you need to do is protect yourself. Germs, bacteria, and other parasites are everywhere, just use common sense.

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Amanda V.
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Amanda V.
7 years ago

Although this topic is not the most yummy thing to talk about I found it helpful. I would much rather know about health concerns than not.

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Bonnie279
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Bonnie279
7 years ago

Can this cause blindness in dogs, too?

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Maxi78
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Maxi78
7 years ago

great, my dog eats anything, even cat crap he finds.

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Elizabeth B.
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Elizabeth B.
7 years ago

Hmm... I thought treatment for worms in cats is very harsh and should be done no more than 2x a year?

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Jennifer  S.
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Jennifer S.
7 years ago

I think we get a little tied up worrying about the latest and greatest bug. Be smart, keep things clean, help people and animals who are in need.

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Tburge
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Tburge
7 years ago

One thing the article doesn't mention is that it takes some time for infected feces to become infective to humans or other animals. So if you pick up your dog's poop at least once a day and throw it away, this greatly decreases the risk of becoming infected. And, obviously, wash your hands after playing with your animals.

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Hbomba
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Hbomba
7 years ago

Just another reason that people should take pet healthcare seriously!

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Linda W.
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Linda W.
7 years ago

Keep teaching those kids, to wash, wash ,wash those hands. We need to keep on this. So Our compainion animal don't get the blame.

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Amykady
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Amykady
7 years ago

Good that this information is getting out, I honestly didn't realize how easy it can be to transmit this. We always wear gloves and wash our hands when volunteering at the shelter, but I'm going to be extra careful now.

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