Cutting-Edge Pet Care

August 30, 2010 | By Jay Speiden | Category: Health & Wellness | 4 comments
Tags: health & wellness, lifestyle & trends, vet, vet specialist, vet care, pet care, pet health, dog health, cat health

Hip and Joint Replacement – These procedures have been available for dogs for a while now, but new advancements in the way they are done have increased the success of these operations tenfold. The main difference is that doctors no longer require the use of “bone cement,” a compound that was once used to keep the replacement joints in place. This often led to infection which, in turn, led to the replacement being rejected.

Laser Surgery – Lasers are commonly used when very small, precise cuts are required for biopsies, eye surgeries, or as method of removing small tumors. Again, the procedure's biggest benefit is that laser surgery is incredibly precise and, therefore, minimally invasive.

Endoscopy - Endoscopy allows doctors to see an animal’s internal organs by inserting a long, flexible tube into the body. The tip of the tube contains a video chip and a light that captures images and sends them to a video monitor. This is a very useful and non-invasive way to diagnose internal injuries or tumors.

Ultrasound - In ultrasound, a device called a transducer emits very high frequency sound waves into the animal’s body and then measures the waves that bounce back. A computer interprets the pattern of sound reflection and creates a still picture or a moving image on a monitor. Ultrasound is painless and requires no chemicals, radiation, or entry into the body. This makes it safe to use on delicate tissue like the retina, the spinal cord or developing fetuses.

MRI - Magnetic resonance imaging systems utilize a combination of powerful magnets and radio wave technology to produce images of animals’ internal organs and structures. They are also used for detecting cancerous growths and tumors.

Of course, all these advances can be costly. In fact, most of these advanced treatments are very expensive. “Watching people who love their pets, but can’t afford some of these treatments, struggle with the decision to seek treatment or not is the most difficult part of my job,” Dr. Kerstetter admits. “At the same time, I’ve been shocked at the lengths people go to prolong the life of the pets they love. I’ve seen people sell their cars or take out second mortgages on their homes to spend another year of quality time with their animals.”

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Nata1923
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Nata1923
3 years ago

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Denise L.
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Denise L.
4 years ago

I've heard that chemo for pets is different & the pets don't have as bad as a reaction...but then I watched an episode of "Dogs 101" where, I think, an English sheepdog had cancer, went through chemo & was lethargic & lost his fur from it, like a human would. I think it depends on the pet....but I'm still not a fan of chemo...it can lead to other problems (like my great aunt, who had congestive heart failure from the chemo weakening her heart).

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