Readers' Comments

add comment

Article:

Sat, Apr 5 | By Ronda Scholting | 176

GOLDEN, Colo. -- The shelter community calls it “Kennel Crazy,” and it’s one of the leading reasons why an otherwise healthy dog becomes unadoptable. A kennel crazy dog will often bark and jump uncontrollably, making it drastically… more ›

Curing ‘Kennel Crazy’ Dogs Increases Adoption Chances
111 results

1 | 2 |

Rhonda T.
Flag

Rhonda T.
5 years ago

It is a common thing to see dogs living in kennels. sometimes there isn't enough space or volunteers to give them everything that they deserve. Kudos to this facility for doing what they do and for sharing it with others.

Good Point | Reply ›

Ethan W.
Flag

Ethan W.
5 years ago

Hopefully all shleters can take some tips from this

Good Point | Reply ›

Betty W.
Flag

Betty W.
5 years ago

Simple to cure if they can get volunteers to walk the dogs 3 times a day for at least 30 minutes so the dogs get exercise and interaction. Easier said than done.

Good Point | Reply ›

Geoff L.
Flag

Geoff L.
5 years ago

A common problem for shelters...our shelter has volunteers who come in and take dogs for LONG walks and for courtyard play.

Good Point | Reply ›

Buckking
Flag

Buckking
5 years ago

I have seen many kennel crazy dogs and they do seem intimating and obnoxious I am glad they are trying hard to keep this problem under control

Good Point | Reply ›

Walt E.
Flag

Walt E.
5 years ago

Geat idea, just hope you can get the volunteers you need to keep it running

Good Point | Reply ›

Stacy M.
Flag

Stacy M.
5 years ago

I am glad they are trying to help the unadoptable dogs everyone needs help in one way or another. All need love and that usually fixes all things bad. Depression is bad in animals and humans.

Good Point | Reply ›

L.H.S.
Flag

L.H.S.
5 years ago

We see this occasionally in our shelter, but more so in cats than in dogs. Our "kennel crazy" cats will pace back and forth in the cat pen. At this point, they become daily office cats which usually turns them around.

Good Point | Reply ›

Oldmaidcatwoman
Flag

Oldmaidcatwoman
5 years ago

So nice to read about all the different ways animals are being helped to find homes.

Good Point | Reply ›

Halahala459
Flag

Halahala459
5 years ago

Kennel Stress is never good, but training a dog with a kennel is a better way to go. It is very true how the dogs get very very bad temper. For example, people who breed dogs make the poor puppies live in horrible conditions. And when Animal Rescue services come and save the dogs they are vicious.

Good Point | Reply ›

Sherri R.
Flag

Sherri R.
5 years ago

I have seen dogs who are stressed being kenneled and exercise and time in the office and out of the kennel is key. We are fortunate to have a nice securely fenced in yard and lots of wonderful volunteers. Our dogs are out every day exercising, being trained and socialized.

Good Point | Reply ›

Ralph M.
Flag

Ralph M.
5 years ago

I used to volunteer at an Animal Control where dogs were only allowed out of their kennels for a couple hours on weekends.Kennel stress was a real problem there.At the shelter where I volunteer now, we have two seperate play areas that are used every day by a great staff and volunteers.The difference is huge. I feel we should do away with keeping dogs at AC,give them to a shelter, and divert the money from the city to the shelter.AC usually just kills the dogs anyway.

Good Point | Reply ›

Andy K.
Flag

Andy K.
6 years ago

Isn't this what every volunteer program does - give the animals some socialization and opportunities to get out of the shelter? I don't mean to belittle this program, I mean to stress the importance of volunteers everywhere who help the dogs immeasurably.

Good Point | Reply ›

Meg S.
Flag

Meg S.
6 years ago

WE have done the same thing at our shelter. Volunteers come in and take the dogs our for exercise, working on behaviors and training and just having fun. they will also split dogs up in to play groups so they can interact with each other and play.
Great program.

Good Point | Reply ›

Sarah  W.
Flag

Sarah W.
6 years ago

GREAT GREAT!

Good Point | Reply ›

Kate H.
Flag

Kate H.
6 years ago

This works I have seen it first hand

Good Point | Reply ›

KAREN p.
Flag

KAREN p.
6 years ago

I think that this is great and the volunteers who help out Table Mountain Animal Center are some of the best people I have ever met! Good job !!!!

Good Point | Reply ›

Sydney  S.
Flag

Sydney S.
6 years ago

Aw I am glad that they are helping these dogs find a good home! :3 Every animal deserves to be loved.

Good Point | Reply ›

Suzanne P.
Flag

Suzanne P.
6 years ago

I think that this is a great idea!!! All of us shelter volunteers can relate to this. I also think it sounds like a good way for the shelter volunteers to bond - take the dogs for a hike or walk in a park!

Good Point | Reply ›

Missi R.
Flag

Missi R.
6 years ago

Ditto on the thumbs up to this shelter! Great approach and kudos for not giving up on the animals. :)

Good Point | Reply ›

Leximou
Flag

Leximou
6 years ago

Thumbs up to anything that will help these fur-kids find homes. Thank the powers that be for people that are innovative enough to help them do so - after all they do depend on us for both care and love. A pox on the sorry aspect of humanity that put them in such a situation to begin with. To this shelter - You rock!!!!!

Good Point | Reply ›

Amy R.
Flag

Amy R.
6 years ago

They all deserve and chance and everything that we can do to give them that chance is wonderful in my eyes. It just makes sense. One of my little ones was a beast in the kennel but she was more than wonderful when we took her out of the kennel. in fact she jumped in my arms when i bent down.

Good Point | Reply ›

Denise L.
Flag

Denise L.
6 years ago

One of my dogs was cage-defensive, so she bit the bars of her cage & got snippy with cagemates (so they had her separated). No one wanted her because she looked so vicious-in fact, my family originally walked right by her because of this. When the employee took her out to show her how calm & sweet she actually is, she was brought home during the 2nd visit! I'm so glad we have her!

Good Point | Reply ›

Mary G.
Flag

Mary G.
6 years ago

Common sense prevails at the Table Mountain Animal Center. Of course, a dog has to be walked and walked often. I am not an expert, but just from the experience of having a Great Dane companion for many years, I know that a well exercised dog is a quieter happier dog. I have done volunteer work for New York City Mayor's Alliance. They hold their adoption events in major NYC parks. Some of the participating shelters are so small and have so little money and so little publicity and therefore so few volunteers that their dogs simply "do not know how to walk on a leash". I once had the pleasure of walking the most beautiful golden retriever, the sweetest girl in the world, but she took me for the walk and not the other way around. She was the guest of a No Kill shelter so her bad behavior could not be held against her, but if she had strolled with me slowly and proudly amongst all the folks who came to the event she would have been an almost sure thing to get adopted that very day. Table Mountain is doing the right thing.

Good Point | Reply ›

sierra w.
Flag

sierra w.
6 years ago

wowowoh9sm6o]tu]

Good Point | Reply ›

Tracee G.
Flag

Tracee G.
6 years ago

wow interesting story.

Good Point | Reply ›

Cindy M.
Flag

Cindy M.
6 years ago

Wow somebody is actually listen to the dogs. This is terrific.

Good Point | Reply ›

D. Rene
Flag

D. Rene
6 years ago

This is a great program. I know my dog is alot calmer after he has been walked. He gets tired of being in the house.

Good Point | Reply ›

Theranddav
Flag

Theranddav
6 years ago

It is great to see that shelters are finally realizing that even though the animals have been rescued from bad situations, that these animals still need to be loved and worked with. I think that hiking and playing with them is a fantastic way to deal with the constant boredom of being behind bars. We all sit here and argue that puppy mills are so bad because of the breeding and the small cages they live their lives in. Besides the not breeding, are the shelters any different? If a kennel krazy dog is in a no kill shelter, their whole lives now will be in a small cage. Our shelter takes the dogs out as much as possible. I think most shelters do. Maybe, there should be a little more time put into making sure these dogs get out to walk and play. I think this shelter with the hiking is really doing a great service to their charges. The numbers speak for themselves. 80% of the dogs they have worked with have been adopted. Absolutly fantastic!!

Good Point | Reply ›

Alexis93
Flag

Alexis93
6 years ago

great story

Good Point | Reply ›

Bianca
Flag

Bianca ".
6 years ago

I am going to start helping to walk dogs at my local shelter. What a great thing folks in the community can do!

Good Point | Reply ›

Morgan
Flag

Morgan
6 years ago

You want to hold & reassure the kennel crazies, but other tasks can override this.

Good Point | Reply ›

Ourstaff
Flag

Ourstaff
6 years ago

I don't think that it is just dogs that have this problem. I think that cats can have problems with a cage environment too. My current foster (Fred) is very withdrawn. It took me days to get him to look and respond to me.

Good Point | Reply ›

connie
Flag

connie
6 years ago

of course a dog would go crazy...duh! if you are a no kill shelter, you must do more then pen the dogs and hope for the best

Good Point | Reply ›

TeriWarner
Flag

TeriWarner
6 years ago

OF COURSE EXERCISE WORKS. THEY CALL LONG TIMERS ANIMALS THAT ARE THERE FOR MORE THAN 2 MONTHS? MANY OF OUR DOGS HAVE BEEN THERE FOR 5 YEARS. I WOULD LOVE TO EXERCISE EVERY ONE OF THEM EVERY DAY BUT...... THERE JUST AREN'T ENOUGH HOURS IN THE DAY AND NOT ENOUGH VOLUNTEERS.

Good Point | Reply ›

tender p.
Flag

tender p.
6 years ago

good !!! i wish more places did things like this .. a tired dog is a happy well behaved dog!

Good Point | Reply ›

Chrissy
Flag

Chrissy
6 years ago

Great story!

Good Point | Reply ›

Carryl D.
Flag

Carryl D.
6 years ago

Geez, can this be passed on to other shelters??? ITS GREAT!!!

Good Point | Reply ›

Kim E.
Flag

Kim E.
6 years ago

What a great story!

Good Point | Reply ›

Julie
Flag

Julie
6 years ago

I'm glad they found a way to help the dogs with their anxiety and depression. I would be depressed also if I were in a cell.

Good Point | Reply ›

Sara S.
Flag

Sara S.
6 years ago

it's a kennel, can you blame them?

Good Point | Reply ›

Emilyg730
Flag

Emilyg730
6 years ago

makes sense. i would be pretty upset if i was locked in a cage! great work guys!

Good Point | Reply ›

Heather S.
Flag

Heather S.
6 years ago

It's like "cabin fever". But people who come to the shelter to look at dogs should be educated so that they know that the behvaior the dogs display while in the kennels may not be their normal behavior.

When I go to our local humane society, we always know the new dogs. The new ones stay in the back, and they don't try to get people's attention. They are waiting for their owners to come back. After a few days, they figure it out, and then they are in the front vying for the people's attention just like everyone else there. when dog gets out because someone wants to look at them or adopt, the other dogs go nuts with barking. It's like prison, when the prisoners bang their cups on the bars when someone gets out.

Good Point | Reply ›

Marisa E.
Flag

Marisa E.
6 years ago

That is a good point.

We often have dogs who exhibit the opposite behavior...they are depressed and/or timid and hide in the back of their kennels or stay outside. When they are in a visiting room they are slow to come up to people, and when they finally do (if the people are willing to stay long enough) they turn into lap dogs. I try hard to explain that many of these dogs are from the most intelligent, active breeds...and they aren't likely to stay quiet and docile when they feel safe in their new homes!

Good Point | Reply ›

Lori R.
Flag

Lori R.
6 years ago

Heather, this is exactly the reason that we don't allow potential adopters to come walking through the kennels- only the volunteers are allowed. We have a book with pictures of the dogs and a little bio (anything we learned of previous history, then whatever information from the trainer that evaluates the dogs). Once we feel we have a good match, then we will bring the dog up for them to be met.
It does make it too crazy for the dogs with all sorts of people walking in and out. The dogs then know when the volunteers come, that they are going out for a walk or in a yard to play.
I realize that not every shelter is equipped to do these things. But we always try to keep the dogs best interest in mind. These poor things have enough trauma in their lives.

Good Point | Reply ›

Maggiethecat
Flag

Maggiethecat
6 years ago

It's nice to see that this problem is becoming more recognized. It's effort that is very rewarding. Hope it catches on everywhere!

Good Point | Reply ›

Jennifer K.
Flag

Jennifer K.
6 years ago

This is exactly why I decided to start volunteering at a shelter. I take my dog on a morning walk EVERY day, and in bad weather he walks on the treadmill. He does awesome at home - there's truth in "Tired puppies are Good puppies." More publicity is needed to get more volunteers - I didn't realize until just recently that I could volunteer for the 3 hours a week that I have available. I thought it took more of a commitment.

Good Point | Reply ›

Amanda R.
Flag

Amanda R.
6 years ago

I wish the shelters around here did this. so much better chance of a dog being adopted and not returned

Good Point | Reply ›

Suzanne P.
Flag

Suzanne P.
6 years ago

Great idea. I have seen perfectly "normal" dogs outside of the kennel act up inside. You would too!

Good Point | Reply ›

Lisa
Flag

Lisa
6 years ago

I'm glad to find out that there is a way to help these dogs. It is important to keep them in adoptable condition, even if their stay in a shelter is long.

Good Point | Reply ›

Kittypassion
Flag

Kittypassion
6 years ago

Great program. All animals need exercise. It would be great if all shelters could have no-cage areas. They also need interaction with humans and need play time.

Good Point | Reply ›

Stephanie Y.
Flag

Stephanie Y.
6 years ago

I'm glad that they are finding a way to help.

Good Point | Reply ›

1 | 2 |

Add Your Comment

Already have an account? Log in now for faster commenting or Join Zootoo

 

You might also enjoy:

Top Stories

We’ve all grown accustomed to the many fundraisers and charitable events that the pet industry produces for homeless pets. From pet food companies… more ›

Helping Pet Rescues is Good For Business

Advertisement

Advertisement