Product:
Lactated Ringers
Rating: 4.9

Average rating from 38 reviews.

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26 reviews

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Haley H.
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Rating: 5

Great fluid replacement for rabbits

posted 6 years ago

I use lactated ringers in rabbits who are dehydrated or under the weather. It really helps to get the extra fluids in them quickly. It also helps act as a buffer when giving injectable meds such as PenG as it takes the sting out and makes the thick liquid easier to inject.

Pros: Safe and Effective

Cons: None

20 of 20 people found this review helpful.

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Bridget L.
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Rating: 5

A must for critical care, elder care

posted 5 years ago

I'll address kitties only in this review to be specific. For older cats suffering from a variety of chronic ailments (renal failure is a big one) administration of subcutaneous lactated ringers can greatly improve quality of life and extend time with your kitty. Your vet can show you how to give sub q and advise on amount and frequency. For young kittens, a very small amount sub q can give them that extra boost to help get them on their feet. LRS is used in veterinary hospitals everywhere and can be administered intraveinously or subcutaneously. (pet owners would use the sub q method) This is done easily by making a "tent" under the cat's skin and placing the needle into the "tent" Some people like to use a syringe with needle to push ringers - while this may be quick, I find that most cats do not appreciate this method of administration and it can be difficult for an owner to restrain and administer by themselves. The sub q administration method that I prefer is to hook up an IV line to the bag of LRS, attach needle and run the fluids in this manner under the skin. This method is indeed slower than with a syringe but usually results in much less fussing on the part of the cat. Remember when using this method that gravity is your friend - hang the bag of ringers as high as possible to encourage them to run faster. I find that most folks can administer fluids in this manner by themselves if need be and most cats are much more agreeable to this more gradual method.

Pros: Variety of administration methods, easy to use

Cons: USE ONLY UNDER GUIDANCE OF VETERINARIAN

6 of 6 people found this review helpful.

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teresa d.
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Rating: 5

Wouldnt want to be without this!

posted 6 years ago

This may mean the difference between life and death for some of our animals. Just today, we had 2 older kittens in our shelter with significant oral inflammation and dehydration. We gave them subcutaneous LRS fluids and Hills a/d canned mixed with water to get some hydration into them.

They are so easy to give that volunteers can easily be trained on how to administer subcutaneous fluids.

Pros: Can really jump start a sick/dehydrated animal, inexpensive, easy to administer

Cons: None

4 of 4 people found this review helpful.

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Dewitt G.
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Rating: 5

The fluid of choice for cats with renal failure

posted 5 years ago

I gave my cat with chronic renal failure (CRF) over 1800 daily sub-q injections of lactated ringers before her death from pneumonia. Contrary to what some vets believe, CRF cats metabolize lactate just fine unless they also have serious liver problems so that is not a reason to use more expensive fluids such as Normosol or PlasmaLyte. And normal saline is just a plain bad choice. Normosol and PlasmaLyte may sting some cats when given sub-q and normal saline is almost guaranteed to sting.

I purchased lactated ringers from my local Costco for about $2 / bag when buying a case of 12. Many other pharmacies can also get lactated ringers for their customers.

deg

Pros: inexpensive, doesn't sting as some other fluids can

Cons: maybe contraindicated in cats with high calcium levels

2 of 2 people found this review helpful.

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Rflowers
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Rating: 5

Good for CRF cats

posted 6 years ago

My cat, PJ, was diagnosed with Chronic Renal Failure. My wife and I had to learn how to administer subq fluids to make him comfortable. We always used lactated ringers. I do advise placing the bag in a sink with warm water. It warms the fluid and is more comfortable for the cat.

Pros: necessary evil

Cons: none

4 of 4 people found this review helpful.

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