Discussions

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Debbie
depdog

Posted on December 19, 2008 | 2

We got a new Peking duck about 3 weeks ago. He was given up to the local feed store because his person was moving and could not care for him. When we adopted him he was skinny and his beak was pale yellow. In the time he has been with us he has fa… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on September 2, 2008

Incubation of duck eggs is not all that difficult and can be very rewarding, but it is important that you use an accurate egg incubator and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Following are general conditions recommended for hatching eggs & e… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on September 2, 2008

Humidity Readings If your egg incubator is big enough there are some ways to measure humidity. One way to make your own wet bulb thermometer is to place the end of a short, hollow shoestring over the end of a thermometer. Place the other end in a co… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on September 2, 2008

Should You Help Your Hatchlings? Many people want to help their ducklings hatch. It is best to allow them to do the hatching themselves. The only time you want to help them is when they make a hole and then cannot progress because they are stuck in … more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on September 2, 2008

More On Candling Eggs can be candled after about seven days of incubation. The advantage of candling is that you can remove infertile or rotten, infected eggs. Eggs are candled in a dark room by shining a flashlight or other bright light into the eg… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on September 2, 2008

Caring for Your Ducklings After They Hatch Keep them warm and to feed them as follows... Small ducks need warmth (they can't supply it themselves). You need to buy or make a "brooder" for their warmth and protection. To make one yourself, get a bi… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on September 2, 2008

At the same time, baby ducklings do need lots of water with their food as they must have water to swallow. Due to the issues in the previous paragraph, you must devise a way for them to drink lots of water without diving into their drinking water. Th… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 25, 2008

Whether you have just spent 28 days hatching duck eggs in an incubator, bought ducklings from a store or received them as a gift, knowing how to care for them properly is important. Baby ducks only require a few basic elements to remain healthy and g… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 25, 2008

3. The third element is the heat source. * The best heat source is a heat lamp with an infrared bulb. Regular light bulbs will not work as well because they do not put out enough heat. Choosing the best set up will depend on the amount of ducklings … more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 22, 2008 | 1

It is probably around Easter time, and you see those cute, fuzzy little ducklings. Or, maybe someone already gave you one. You want to keep the cute little critter. Let me dispel a few myths for starters: * Ducks make great pets: True. * Ducks are s… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 22, 2008

* If you keep the duck eggs in an incubator, you have to decide whom you wish the little ones to imprint on. If you are the one taking care of them, and you handle them, you will be their mama. It's a lot of fun, but only if it's what you want. Of co… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 19, 2008

Keeping ducks healthy requires taking the necessary steps to prevent disease outbreaks from occurring in the first place, and in cases where ducks do become infected, administering appropriate treatment to minimize mortality and morbidity. The follow… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 19, 2008

Duck Virus hepatitis Duck virus hepatitis is a highly fatal contagious disease of young ducklings, 1-28 days of age. Ducklings are most susceptible at the younger ages and gradually become more resistant as they grow older. The disease is rarely see… more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 19, 2008

Avian Cholera Avian cholera, also called fowl cholera, caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida is an important disease of domestic ducks, and is an especially troublesome disease of ducks in some parts of Asia. This disease is associated with … more ›
Anonymous
anonymous

Posted on August 19, 2008

Ducks are particularly susceptible to certain toxins, and in some cases strikingly more than chickens or turkeys. Therefore, duck caretakers must be especially diligent in preventing ducks from consuming or being exposed to these toxins. Aflatoxin … more ›

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