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Q: Yorkies and Westies?

October 4, 2011 | By Ches21 | 3 answers | Expired: 1015 days ago

Ches21

Are Yorkshire Terriers and West highland white Terriers good for apartments and what about chihuahua's our rescue and shelter get alot of these and spaniels and doxens too, I have at least two dogs that I have picked out one I have not yet met I know they will most likely have been adopted by then but just in case they haven't I just may have to adopt both of them one of them is named Benny and he is a chihuahua and he is very sweet the other is Charlie boy and he is a chinese crested they both like other dogs but are not at the same rescue and Benny's name if I adopted him would stay the same except I would spell it diffrently it would be spelled Binny and then Charlie Boy's name would change to Boyd or Hector I also like the fact that alot of the dogs our shelter and our rescue's get seem to love cats, But what about these breeds are they good apartment breeds?

Readers' Answers (3)
Kelly
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Oct 05, 2011

Yorkies are good for apartment life, but they can be very active indoors. They require a strong master who won't let them get away with things just because they're small and cute. They don't really know they're small and can become aggressive toward other animals and strangers.They can also bark a lot, which is something you must consider when living in an apartment. They are a true terrier, with terrier stubbornness and this is why they need strong leadership and training, otherwise they can become demanding, jealous, and even neurotic. One of the reasons so many end up in shelters is because people get them thinking they're so tiny and cute that they don't have to be trained, then they can't deal with the consequences of their own inactions.

Westies do okay indoors, but they have to have daily walks. They can develop behavior problems when they don't get enough daily walking time. They're easy to train. They like to dig, like to bark, a lot of them like to chase cats for fun. They like to run. They typically get along with people and other dogs. They also need consistent, confident leadership to prevent them from developing behavior problems like biting.

Chihuahuas are also good apartment dogs, but they still need space even though they're small. They need room to play and they need to go on daily walks. Chis (and many other small dogs) that are allowed to get away with things because it's cute, can develop small dog syndrome, meaning the dog think he or she is the boss or leader of the household, including you, so socialization and consistent, firm training is imperative. If not they can develop behavior issues like aggression with other dogs and sometimes people, suspicion of strangers. They also develop behavior problems if not walked enough. Typically they aren't good with kids.

Chinese Cresteds are also active little dogs that do okay in apartments but need to satisfy that instinct to walk daily. I used to know someone who had a Crested who did agility, so they really are active even though they're small. They're very smart. They need to be well-socialized and acclimated to loud noises and activity as puppies. They're not typically known to be barkers. They like to run and are usually good with other pets. The hairless variety can get injured easily. They need firm leadership.

The problem with really small dogs is that they can all develop small dog syndrome. That is typically the fault of people. People baby them because they're so small, cute, and cuddly. They treat them like babies. So they become stubborn, headstrong, develop behavior problems such as biting, food protecting, aggression, and suspicion. You have to be a confident leader with these dogs and always correct any bad behavior immediately, or they take over. That's not different than any other dog, it's just that most people treat them differently and allow the bad behaviors creating an out-of-control dog. Any dog that can't be controlled is not good for apartment life. There are too many variables that you can't control that could get you and your dog in trouble.

My suggestion is to wait until you get your apartment before you pick your dog. Then, don't go in with a preconceived idea of, "this is what I'm looking for." There's nothing "special" about having purebreds. They're just another dog, so look around when you're ready to adopt. Mixed breeds make wonderful pets too and usually have fewer health issues than purebreds. Usually there will be one or two at that time that will really tug at your heart and they may be dogs that aren't even on your radar right now. Same with naming them. I always wait until I know their personality so their name fits them.

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Jillian
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Oct 05, 2011

For the most part, yes. The only questionable breeds are the spaniels. Some are great for apartment living, like the American cocker spaniel or the Cavalier King Charles spaniel, while others such as the Brittany spaniel or springer spaniel would not be. The English cocker spaniel is iffy, as they're more of a field line than the showy, family oriented American version.

In the end, it all boils down to energy levels. Does the dog need to run around in a backyard throughout the day or can they happily be exercised on a few walks/bathroom breaks? Usually smaller breeds require less exercise. Simply b/c a walk intended for a big dog would be too much for them.

You will want to take into account how often you'll be home. If you're going to work and school and entertaining a social life, a dog wouldn't be a good idea at first. It's good to fall into what will be your normal routine before choosing your companion. Like how I won't adopt to someone who's moved recently. You never really know what your schedule will be like until you've lived somewhere 4-6 months. What would be really cool is if you got an easily trainable dog who you could take anywhere.

Also keep in mind that most people move back home within three years of moving out their first time - so you'll want a dog that Skitters approves of. In most cases you'll be back on your own within a year of moving back home {and usually for good}, but that could be a really long year if the dogs aren't buddies.

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Poppy W.
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Oct 11, 2011

Most small breeds are okay for apartments, so long as they have a good meal and exercise plan, and yes, Westies are good for the most part. As long as you take care of them. A lot of chihuahuas bark a lot, and might not be suitable for apartments. But small-medium sized dogs tend to be best. So be careful and take into consideration their noise level. =)

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