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Q: What is the best weight to keep weight up on a dog who is on a bland diet

April 28, 2008 | By Joe B. | 4 answers | Expired: 2317 days ago

What is the best weight to keep weight up on a dog who is on a bland diet

My female pit had a bout of pancreatitis about two months ago. Fortunately it was mild and she has recovered from it. However, we now have her on a very bland diet of baked chicken (no skin), white rice, and small elbow pasta, mixed with her WD kibble. I have been feeding her a mixture of 1 cup kibble and 1 cup cooked food in the AM, at noon and in the PM. She has dropped about 4 lbs since we started this. I would also note that we do a 3 mile walk every AM (except in the rain, they HATE the rain), and a 2 miler in the PM. She has gone from 60 lbs to 56 lbs.

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Joanna
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Apr 28, 2008

I did some extra research for another Pet Parent on pancreatic problems in dogs. One of the main jobs the pancreas performs is to release enzymes in the digestive tract to digest food. When the pancreas becomes inflamed, either from trauma or infection or some other unknown cause (most cases have unknown causes), the enzymes are not realeased in the tract, but rather back into the pancreas itself.

Fat is usually blamed for pancreatitis, but in truth if the animal's system is already failing, then a high-fat diet (usually junky food and many junky treats) will only escalate the problem, not BE the cause of the problem.

A diet low in fat is recommended for the days and weeks following the attack. I would simply put your dog on a natural diet and not worry about fat levels too much at this point, because with a balanced diet, their system should stay normal.

Two or three meals a day would be best for consistent energy levels and to keep her from being hungry throughout the day. If you figure a 50 lb. dog eats about 1 lb. of food a day, that's 5 1/2 to 8 oz. each meal, which doesn't sound like much, but if it is dense, nutritious food, she should thrive on it, especially combined with your regular exercise.

Here is the simplest recipe you can use for your Pittie:

3/4 cup chopped or ground meat
1/4 cup ground mixed vegetables/fruit

This makes about 8 oz. of food. You can of course make more by ratio and freeze it right away. It can be more handy to thaw her dinner if you're running low on free time in the future.

This is preferably fed raw, because then all nutrients are intact, but if your pup prefers it cooked, that's fine, it won't lose too many nutrients, especially if the vegetables are par-boiled.

Also, I would eliminate the white rice, or at least replace it with brown, long-grain wild, or barley or quinoa - white rice is absolutely nutritionally dead; it's been stripped of nutrition and does about as much good as eating styrofoam or Mickey D's. I'd also do away with the elbow pasta. Produced pasta in grocery stores are a bit better than white rice, but not by much - there's not much nutrition there. You'd be far better off mixing in some vegetable matter instead of starchy carbs - a dog's digestive system is so harsh and quick that these carbs aren't being processed, anyways. A few colorful vegetables and fruits (but remember, NO toxic onions or grapes) would be a great boost of natural nutrition to get your dog back on her feet. You can also add some Dannon Naturals yogurt or Greek yogurt to reintroduce some healthy bacteria to her system.

If your dog still displays a pleasing outline both from the side and from above, I wouldn't worry too much about the weight loss. Of course, if it doesn't stop, or you are seeing too much ribs and hips, talk again with your vet or consult a natural health vet about your options.

Best of luck to you and your dog!

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Marta J.
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Apr 28, 2008

Wd is usually used for animals for weight management. Vets use it for overweight diabetic dogs. Maybe that's why the weight loss. You might want to tell you vet about the weight loss.

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Beaglepawz
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Apr 28, 2008

I do agree that you should discuss the weight concerns with your vet as they know the history of your animal and what the weight should be.

My cairn who passed a way a few years ago had chronic pancreatitis and so was on a bland kibble - Iams Low residue. She got their treats too. She could have carrots, canned pumpkin and a few other things like that and took Pepcid daily.

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Jill R.
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Apr 28, 2008

56 pounds still may be her ideal weight, most dogs now in the US are slightly to way overweight. Leaner animals, in general are healthier. I would recommend to stop by with her at your vet and have them check her body condition score, that way you will know whether she's the right size or not.
PS. my dogs hate the rain too...

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