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Q: What can I do?

December 31, 2011 | By Melody | 2 answers | Expired: 1009 days ago

What can I do?

My 16 yr female has been showing some troubling signs. Severe weight loss, lots of vomit with undigested food, frequent small amounts of urination, and she seems to always be hungry. She has little bumps on her skin that I can feel when I pet her. She doesn't seem to be in pain and sometimes she acts like she's a kitten again. I am just worried about her and am wondering if there is anything I can do to help her out. I have talked to her vet and she told me that as long as the cat didn't seem to be in pain, to just let her live. I hate taking her to the vet because it just stresses her out and she is very difficult to deal with. She becomes an absolute wild cat at the vet and tries to tear everyone apart. Any ideas as to what I can do? Thanks.

Readers' Answers (2)
NonGlassMenagerie
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Dec 31, 2011

I can't imagine a vet not doing a blood work up when your cat presented with those symptoms. Senior cats can often end up with chronic illness that can be controlled with diet and/or medication. Diabetes and CRF are two diseases that are very common, esp. in seniors, that cause the symptoms you described. The bumps on her skin may just be lipomas, also something that is common in senior pets, but they could also be something more serious and need to be checked out. Our senior pets need regualr checkups that include lab work so we can catch those manageable illnesses before they become devastating. I'd recommend another vet if your's doesn't think bloodwork is in order here.

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Kelly
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Jan 04, 2012

I would definitely get a second opinion if your vet doesn't feel the need to do lab work. Senior cats can be prone to a variety of age-related illnesses that can kill them if left untreated. I have a 17-year-old cat with Chronic Renal Failure. She's had it 3 years and lost a ton of weight. She is also prone to throwing up. She was diagnosed through blood tests after she lost weight. She stayed in the hospital for several days getting IV meds to bring her levels back to normal. After that she was placed on a special diet. Feline diabetes and Hyperthyroidism also cause weight loss. The good thing is that they can all be treated if caught early enough.

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