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Q: Volunteering

October 25, 2009 | By Ssilberman | 4 answers | Expired: 1772 days ago

My girls are 12 and love animals. They would like to volunteer at the Randolph Municipal Pound. Is this possible? I am willing to take them over on Saturdays to help out. I think it will help them feel that they are contributing to so many homeless animals that they feel helpless about.

Readers' Answers (4)
Anonymous
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Anonymous

Oct 25, 2009

You would have to check with the pound first, but I'm pretty sure that most shelters will let children help socialize the animals as long as there is an adult there with them. Very good idea for your girls, they will love it. The only thing I might recommend is you might want to think about helping out a no-kill shelter because it may upset them to see dogs that are going to be put to sleep. It still depresses me. Poor dogs, they don't deserve to die that way.

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Katie M.
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Oct 26, 2009

I'm not sure about that specific shelter's policy, but usually it's fine as long as they have an adult with them.

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Jillian
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Oct 26, 2009

it's dependent on the shelter. some allow kids, some don't, and some have certain hours for them.
one thing to consider is how aware your daughters are of shelters. when i was 12 i wanted to volunteer, but now i can't even go into one. i would ask the pound if they are no-kill when you ask about children volunteering. though your kids won't assist in euthanizing animals, they will still be conscious of it happening. helping out at a shelter sounds like fun when kids think about all the animals they're helping, but the reality of it sets in when you go and see all the unwanted animals in cages. it's heart wrenching, and the longer you're there, the more you see the same faces being passed by. though i think kids should be educated on all of this, i also see how hard it could be going in w/one perspective and leaving w/another.
another idea would be to find a local wildlife rehabilitation center. though some animals have to be euthanized, they usually have a good turnover rate where the animals can be released back into the wild. plus it's really exciting to see a baby deer or hawk or owl up close in person. you may also want to consider fostering, this can be through shelters or wildlife rehabilitation, and it really gives the kids a hands-on experience that teaches them immense responsibility and empathy b/c it's not for just a couple of hours over the weekend.

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