Flag

Q: Thoughts on Adoption Fees

May 25, 2009 | By Bellacat3 | 20 answers | Expired: 1781 days ago

Bellacat3

I volunteer with a small shelter that charges $150 adoption fee for a single kitten. It costs the shelter approximately $165 in medical costs just to get the kitten ready for adoption. The adoption fee covers the spay or neuter surgery, vaccines, test for Feline Leukemia and Feline AIDS viruses, and a microchip. Other shelters in the area only charge about $65 to $90 for a kitten but these are large shelters with a spay/neuter clinic in house and a development office. How do we compete? How important is the adoption fee per an animal to a prospective adopter?

Readers' Answers (20)

1 | 2 |

  • Sort by:
  • Latest |
  • Rank
Patricia  C.
Flag

May 31, 2009

I think in these tough economic times adoption fees are very important. Our shelter charges $85.00 for a dog and $65.00 for a cat. You have to take it to the vet, but all of the shots and spay and neuter are included. The vet doesn't do it prior to being adopted though and you don't actually know the health of your dog or cat until you take it into the vet. They do quarantine stray and sick animals and they do euthanize animals so our shelter is a kill shelter. Microchip is up to the owner and isn't included in the adoption fees. I have adopted 2 dogs from the shelter and 2 from free puppy ads. The shelter dogs were definitely the cheapest.

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Bonnie  M.
Flag

May 28, 2009

At one of our no-kill shelters, they charge $150.00 for a kitten, also. Senior cats are as little as $25. Dogs are between $40 and $90. I don't think any of this is extreme when you consider what all goes into making sure people have a healthy pet of the temperment and age etc. they are looking for.

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

DeAndra
Flag

May 27, 2009

Yes, $150 is somewhat high. But you are also including some very important services to your cats and kittens.

The thing I would suggest is to make sure your marketing is up to par. Remember: you can sell ice cubes to Eskimos if you market it right! Make sure that the people know what they are getting with each kitten, and make sure that the people know what they would pay if they went to the vet and had those services done their selves. Also, maybe think about having special days where the price is lowered, just to get people in the door and thinking about the kittens and to get your name out there. Another option might be going to local vets and asking if they would be willing to do charity work for you. They can write the services off at a later date, and you can get these kittens the treatment they need for a much lower cost. Just some thoughts.

Keep up the good work and remember that these little kittens are worth every penny we spend on them! They deserve to have people like you looking out for them!!

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Michele Z.
Flag

May 27, 2009

The fee is "relatively high" and probably will turn off many potential adopters, but these potential adopters probably just don't realize the benefits (and cost-savings) of getting a kitten that has already had these procedures performed.

I'd suggest that you contact veterinary offices within a 10-mile or so radius of your shelter and acquire their fees for each of the services that you have performed on these kittens. Make an itemized list of the costs per vet office and show potential adopters what services they would need to have done (and pay themselves) if your shelter had not already performed them. Perhaps if they realize a $50 kitten with no shots, etc. will cost them at least another $100 at the kitten's first vet visit, they may be more willing to pay the money upfront to your shelter. But you will also need to have proper documentation that each kitten has up-to-date shots and the other services you mentioned.

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Kris
Flag

May 27, 2009

While I think a kitten is certainly worth $150.00, especially with everything that is included as far as spay/neuter, shots, microchip, etc. I believe people are going to look for the least expensive alternative. I would certainly look for ways to cut costs of getting these kitens ready for adoption, as others have mentioned, and also make sure your shelter is marketing everything that comes with the adoption. If there is something your shelter is doing that other shelters are not, make sure people know this. There has to be a reason other shelters have lower adoption fees, when your shelter cannot cover their costs with the $150.00 adoption fee.

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Wendy L.
Flag

May 27, 2009

$150 is more than what most rescues in our area ask for cats, both the big rescues and the little guys. We have a variety of vets in the area, some "ritzy" that offer high-tech gizmos (which are great in specialty cases) or clinics that are just kind vets getting the job done for those that can't afford all the new technology. Many of the vets that do work for the rescues are the ones that don't have heart monitors, require pre-anesthetic bloodwork, or use lasers (though they have these options available upon request for additional fees). As said previously, "shop around" for vets willing to do a couple low-cost or free spays/neuters per month, or cut your shelter a deal if you get all the work done there - its a guaranteed income for them (if theyre a slow clinic, they'll appreciate this) and you know you'll be able to cut costs. Doing some things in clinic if you've got trained volunteers would help, like doing combo shots and fecal tests in-house. The microchip is another non-necessity IMO, but some shelters in our area - including animal control - will not release an animal unless it has a chip so that it will get back to the shelter if it ever turns up elsewhere. A lot of rescues here also only do the core vaccines (not FIV/FelV because the cats are "supposed" to be indoor only) to cut costs. These are just some thoughts, best of luck in your efforts!

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Prevost1580
Flag

May 26, 2009


Cats are not disposeable-

If $150.00 is too high then lets just do more TNR. The more ppl that I meet ... the more I looove my cats.lol~ but also the more I think that ferals are better off. Just reading these posts makes me ill. If a person can not cover the medicals of a kitten & help the shelter help more homeless animals, why would you let such a human adopt a kitten? At least in the colony a cat or kitten learns survival skills & doesn't have to deal with some human throwing them out because of a baby or a new spouse or gf, ect. and then there is always the evil ppl who bitch about the adoption fee but won't think twice about declawing a cat & throwing he or she outside.

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Julie
Flag

May 26, 2009

It seems like a lot of money to pay out for an adoption, but if you stop and think about what costs they are trying to recover it is only a portion .
It is alot to pay what you said, but if you would lets say adopt a cat at a cheaper rate, and get the cat home
and sometime down the road this adopted cat would need some type of procedure, or just the routine preventive maintenance that is needed, you could be spending over $150.00

Thumbs Up: 1 | Thumbs up!

Prevost1580
Flag

May 26, 2009


Misty^ are you f-g serious?! that is kind of high for kitty?! so a pittbull isworth $150.00 but not a kitten. WTF? I don't even know why you are on this thread-

$150.00 is nothing compared to the vet bills and the shelter needs the loot so that they help other animals.

Methinks,Misty needs to get a clue but sadly,most of the public thinks this way. Cats are seen as disposeable.Save money by not testing?! Omg! Do me a favor,Misty & leave kittens & cats,alone!!!!!

That is why we must SPAY/NEUTER!!!! Stupid PPL TOO!!

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Jillian
Flag

May 26, 2009

although the microchip is helpful in certain situations, i wouldn't consider it a must-have. $150 should be a set fee everywhere - many times, people care more for the animals they've invested more money in. sad, but true. it is also too easy to get a kitten for free, making $150 sound insane. personally, i wouldn't pay it. i'd go to a shelter that did everything yours does minus the microchip and spend under $100.

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

1 | 2 |

You might also enjoy:

Got a question about your pet? Get the answers you need from Zootoo's community of pet experts and owners.

Advertisement

Advertisement