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Q: MALE PROBLEMS

November 20, 2010 | By CHIHUAHUA L. | 1 answer | Expired: 1354 days ago

CHIHUAHUA L.

I HAVE TWO MALE CHIHUAHUA'S, BOTH RECENTLY NUETERED.... ONE IS 1 YR OLD,AND THE OTHER IS 2 YRS OLD... THEY ARE CONSTANTLY FIGHTING, OVER ME AND ALSO ONE OF THE FEMALE DOGS WE HAVE, I HAVE BEEN GETTING IN THE MIDDLE TRYING TO SEPERATE THEM.. BUT I AM NOT SURE IF THIS IS GOING TO WORK, THEY ARE ALSO SPRAYING IN MY HOUSE AND OUTSIDE, WHEN ONE PEE'S, THE OTHER PEE'S ON TOP OF WHERE THE FIRST ONE PEE'S.. PLEASE HELP.... I DON'T WANT TO REHOME THEM, BUT IF I CAN'T CORRECT THE PROBLEM , I MAY HAVE TOO.. AND IT BREAKS MY HEART..

Readers' Answers (1)
Jillian
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Nov 22, 2010

it takes up to a month after being neutered for the testosterone and sperm to filter out of their systems. if it hasn't been a month yet, try separating them. during this time they can still impregnate females and will still be fighting over a girl.
when problems occur prior to being fixed, many times they will continue unless treated individually. such as the marking and fighting. b/c they were together and bashing heads before being neutered, they now have continuing gripes w/one another.
start from square one.
to fix their marking, get a hand help portable black light and a lot of enzymatic cleaner. no other cleaner will work for urine stains. personally, i like nature's miracle, but i've heard good things about zero odor as well. locate the stains using the black light and literally douse the area if it's carpeted. if it's on a hard surface, scrub it using the same cleaner. let the areas air dry. sometimes you'll have to repeat. then treat each dog as though they're not house broke - getting them out 5 times a day during crucial moments such as after eating, sleeping, and playing. do this as long as necessary.
for the fighting, slowly reintroduce them after a month of being fixed. this is best done after a nice, 20 minute walk. keep their time together brief - praise them for good behavior and end the session for bad. for bad behavior, also ignore whoever engaged in the poor behavior for 2-5 minutes - gradually increasing that time the more it occurs.
things to look out for are prolonged eye contact, raised fur, raised tails, dilating pupils, and tense body movement. if you see any of these, attempt to distract the dog to stop the behavior from getting worse.
take it all very slowly. never push either dog to move at a faster pace than they're ready for, that will only add stress to their problem. if one in particular seems to be the aggressor, have them follow several feet behind the other during walks. as they become more comfortable walking behind the other, decrease the space between them slowly until they can walk next to each other, but w/a few feet separating them in case of fights.
never, ever allow them to be in the same room apart from their supervised meetings. this can be tricky, so you may want to alternate which dog gets locked up throughout the day. for instance, have times designated for when one is in a room. alternating hours and nights apart from the family could make this easier on everyone.
there's no guarantee any of this will work, but if you're patient, consistent, and dedicated, you stand a good chance. put all you can into it throughout winter and if by spring you're not seeing results, then consider rehoming one of them. but you must get the marking problem under control before you do - if they mark in a new home, they'll probably end up at the pound.

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