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Q: Male, neutered cat urine marking in the house

January 4, 2009 | By Katie | 11 answers | Expired: 2018 days ago

Katie

I've had my cat Tidus since he was born. His mother was a stray that I befriended when I was about 13 years old. She stuck around our house and we gradually started noticing her getting plumper and plumper. Couple months later, Tidus and 3 siblings were born in our garage in an old dresser drawer.

Fast forward nearly 7 years later.

Tidus is, in my opinion, the coolest and best cat you could ask for. He does, however, come with an unfortunate bad habit that he started doing about 3 years ago; marking urine everywhere.

He was neutered at a young age, and for the first 3 years of his life, was the only cat in the house. When my mother and sister brought home a stray cat they found wandering in the Walmart parking lot and took her in, she gave birth to 8 kittens, all of whom we cared for until giving them up to new homes. During this time, I can only assume that Tidus started having territorial issues with living amongst so many kittens in the house; the majority (8/10) were male. Seven of them went to new homes at around 8 weeks of age, but four of the males lived with us until they were 9 months of age. Family and friends who expressed interest in adopting them from us kept putting it off, or had situations arise and couldn't take them early enough. We ended up keeping one of them, who is Cloud, my sister's cat.

Anyways, we hadn't expected to be keeping them so long, neither of them were neutered like Tidus was, and I'm guessing that sharing the litter box with so male unaltered male cats made Tidus start marking his territory outside of the litterbox. My brother's possessions and clothing, the closet door in my bedroom, and the bathroom shower curtains have been his primary marking spots.

I've tried using separate litter boxes and cleaning his urinated spots with an enzyme solution odor/stain remover spray, followed with a thorough cleaning of the carpet with the steam cleaner, and I'll clap my hands and say "Ah ah!" when I catch him in the act. Also just moved his dearly loved scratching post outside the closet (picture below) but to no avail. He still continues to do it in the same spots, and recently took to urinating on Kadan's dog bed that I've since stopped using. The litterbox will be completely clean with new litter, and he'll still choose to walk up to the hall closet sliding doors, or the ones in my room and mark them, or something that happens to be on the floor. If my closet doors happen to be open, he'll walk inside and mark on my shoes, too.

I'm beginning to wonder if he'll ever use the litterbox 100% of the time to urinate. I hate walking in my room or down the hallway only to catch a whiff of urine. It's become so frustrating, and I've started to buy the enzyme solution in bulk since it's become a necessity.

If anyone has an idea on how to tackle this kind of situation in an alternative way than what I've described, I'd appreciate some input.

Readers' Answers (11)
Niki D.
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Jan 04, 2009

Start with a vet visit to rule out a urinary track infection or stones - sometimes the only way a cat can signal pain is to indescriminately urinate. Rule that out and then confine him in a crate for a week with his litterbox. You can still take him out to play with him but he needs to be in a small space with box to see if he uses it then. If no spraying, put him in a small bathroom with box for a week. If no spraying, gradually increase his territory. Some cats just can't handle sharing their territory and increasing it (especially with multiple cats) is sometimes the only option. You can also talk to your vet about anti-anxiety meds which can sometimes help. He is not really placeable with another family since there's no guarantee he won't do this as a single cat, either, so re-homing him is risky. Good luck

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Mary W.
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Jan 04, 2009

We once had a neutered cat that started peeing on our bed. The vet found that he was diabetic. Please have your cat tested for diabetes.

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sandy K.
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Jan 04, 2009

my grandkids have that problem now with their cat, but its a spayed female. they caught the urine in a plastic bag and took it to the vet. it turns out the cat has UTI, urinary tract infection. they put the cat on antibiotics to help clear it up. hope this helps.

Thumbs Up: 1 | Thumbs up!

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