Flag

Q: kenneling

September 24, 2011 | By Cshuldberg | 3 answers | Expired: 1018 days ago

i still am not sure i got my question answered. this is a dog that is potty train and has been kenneled her entire life. and all of a sudden she does not want to go into her kennel. untill a few days ago she was as eager as our other dog to be kenneled. they are kenneled seperatly. her kennel is clean and warm nothing there has changed. just her attitude towards it has and not sure why.
i have not noticed any other change in her behaviour.
thanks

Readers' Answers (3)
Ches21
Flag

Sep 25, 2011

Maybe she just has decided she does not want to sleep in the kennel at night anymore, all I can say is talk to a petco dog trainer or talk to your vet and ask them I would talk to the dog trainer before the vet if they can not awnser this then talk to your vet I do find this to be very strange behavior she could be sick and is trying to tell you in this way that she doesn't feel good I have heard of stranger ways than this of a pet letting it's owner know that it does not feel good.

Thumbs Up: 1 | Thumbs up!

Kelly
Flag

Sep 26, 2011

I assume since she just stopped using it suddenly, it's not an issue of having outgrown the crate? Is she acting like she's fearful of the crate? Maybe something happened the last time she was in the crate that caused a conditioned fear response. It doesn't always have to be something huge, just something that scared or hurt her and caused her to associate that with the crate. Maybe a sudden loud noise startled her and triggered her fight or flight response but she was in the crate and felt trapped; kids or teens running, roughhousing and yelling too near her crate; a loud argument; a vacuum cleaner or any other loud appliance or tool that she may have felt that she couldn't escape from; a sting or bite from a bug while in the crate; did someone get sidetracked and she was left in too long and began to feel panicky because she needed to potty and now she views the crate as a trap instead of something safe? It's the time of year when mice and other little creatures are finding ways into homes looking for their winter nests. Any new scent in a crate...any scary new sound that occurs while a dog in the crate can set up a fear response. The possibilities are endless and unless you can think back to the day before she stopped liking her crate and pinpoint something, you may never know what caused it. Get her to associate good things with the crate again. Throw her favorite treats in there but don't close the door when she goes in for them. Give her lots of praise when she goes in on her own. Leave the crate door open so she go in at will. Leave a toy, treats, a small bowl of food to tempt her in and help her make pleasant associations with the crate. If she's extremely averse to entering the crate, you may just have to start back at square one with crate training. Don't ever force her into the crate if she's scared of it...you'll only increase her fear.

Thumbs Up: 1 | Thumbs up!

Jillian
Flag

Sep 26, 2011

Something may have happened while she was in the crate. It could be as simple as a loud noise that frightened her, which would be pretty scary to a dog or anyone b/c the crate would make her feel trapped during something like that.

It could also be that she no longer wants to be crated. Though it's what she's used to and a routine you're accustomed to by now, that's not necessarily a bad thing. The general rule of thumb is to kennel a dog no more than 3 hours at a time. This is b/c dogs often go one of two ways after a lot of kenneling: they become dependent on the kennel, adding insecurities to other areas of their life {some you may see, others you may not}, or they want to avoid the kennel altogether. When a dog goes against kenneling due to over-kenneling, it's b/c of boredom. Simply, being in there too long doesn't allow them room to vent even the smallest of energy.

Whatever reason there may be behind why she's shunning her kennel, I'd go with it. Kennels are good for those times that you really need them in there, so you don't want to create a stigma that makes your dog refuse to spend any time in there. Try leaving the door open and feeding her next to it. Also keep a toy or a blanket she really likes in there at all times and never close the door. You can make a game out of the open kennel by tossing treats in so she has free will about entering it and leaving it, thus showing her it's not such a bad thing.

However, this would be a good time to break her of daily kenneling. Let her stay out and monitor her progress. By having daily training sessions - this can be obedience lessons or tricks - you'll raise her confidence and get her mind off of what's upsetting her in the first place. Be sure to exercise her for at least 30-45 minutes every day, more than 60 if she's destructive. Some changes are for the better and she may just be showing you that it's time to try something else.

Thumbs Up: 1 | Thumbs up!

You might also enjoy:

Got a question about your pet? Get the answers you need from Zootoo's community of pet experts and owners.

Advertisement

Advertisement