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Q: Is it easier to introduce a female kitty into a "male" cat household?

April 2, 2010 | By Mary Lee B. | 8 answers | Expired: 1707 days ago

Mary Lee B.

I have one fairly dominant 2 year old male cat. I'd like to get another male, but someone told me that it's hard to introduce a new male into a household where there is already a male. What is your experience?

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Josiesue02
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Apr 09, 2010

It depends on the cat. I would deffinately bring in a kitten though, it would be easier for the older cat to adjust then have two older cats to adjust.

I started out with a female (Shianne) and a male (Ricky) kitten. Then two months later i brought in another male (Stewie) kitten. Ricky hissed at Stewie for a while (maybe a week) and then they were buds. Then about 6 months later i brought in another male (Mater) kitten. Ricky loved him but Stewie didnt like him. Then about a year later Stewie had to be put down and i ended up getting another male (Vinny) kitten. Ricky hated him (for about a week) and Mater loved him. But now everyone gets along.

When i went on my honeymoon, my mom took in my cats. I had 4 adult and my mom had 3 adult cats. They all hissed at each other the whole time we were gone (9 days).

Thats why i think it would be best if you got a kitten, its just easier to intrudce them and it doesnt seem to take too long for the older cats to realize that they can still be the head of the household. Whereas when you bring in another adult they might both fight over whose the head of the household.

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Mousefur
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Apr 07, 2010

It will largely depend on the personality of the cats. But you will have to seperate them and introduce them slowly, supervising visits to begin with. This may take anywhere from a few days to a few months. If the cats are altered it will help with behavior problems. A younger cat might also help your cat feel less threatened. If you are getting the new cat from a shelter or rescue ask the staff for suggestions, and personalities of the cats they have. Also many shelters and rescues will let you bring your cat in for a meet and greet. Even thogh it doesn't work as well with cats at least you will see if there are truly personality conflicts and they want to kill each other, or if they are just upset and saying back off. Remember just like people most animals will get along with most other animals, it is how they are brought up and there are some that just never get along no matter what. Remember they are indivuals and it will take time and patience. Good luck.

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Kayla L.
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Apr 07, 2010

At his age you might get by with a younger cat, male or female. Kitten wouldn't be too draining on a 2 yr old. We had a situation reversed where I started with my bratty girl cat Yue, which was only a few months old and she was introduced to Tommy, just a month her junior. She pissed and moaned about it for a week or two and got over herself.
If your male is overly dominant, having a female over a male isn't going to make a huge difference but a cat that doesn't pose as much of a threat like a kitten may do the trick... then again I could be wrong and your cat is evil and will only ever love you ;-)

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Jillian
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Apr 05, 2010

adult females tend to have a problem w/new cats in their home, but males can be very laid back about it despite the others gender. what it really depends on is how socialized they are to other cats.
the trick is to introduce the new kitty in a comfortable, controlled setting. new kitty should be kept in their own room for a few days while they settle in. if you don't do this, you're going to have two nervous and upset cats. after a few days on their own, bring your cat in for five minutes. reward good behavior w/praise and treats and discipline bad w/time outs - by removing your cat from the room. if they're just a little edgy, bring your cat back in after a few minutes. if they're really upset, wait an hour. the better the are together, the more time they can spend. once they've had a few 20 minute meetings that go well, leave the new cats door open. never force the cat out and try to supervise them. if you have problems, start over.
usually this process takes less than a week, but it can take months. if you're worried, adopt a male cat under 6 months or a really laid back cat - just make sure they're comfortable around cats.

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MICHELLE G.
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Apr 04, 2010

I don't think male, or female makes a difference. It will depend on the personality of your male cat and how you handle the introduction. We had our first male cat for atleast three years before getting a male kitten. It was rough from the start but we supervised them and kept them seperated at night. Slowly they came around and then had to make way for all the others that came after that! Best of luck! : )

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Michele Z.
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Apr 03, 2010

Provided the cats are spayed/neutered, I think it largely depends on the individual cats. One of the cats is going to be dominant one way or the other, and the cats will work this out on their own. Your resident cat may have "dibs", but he COULD lose his dominance to another cat, male or female.

If you are adopting from a shelter (which I hope you are), the staff usually have a good idea of the particular cat's personality and whether or not s/he gets along with other cats. You can consult the staff about this when choosing either a male or a female!

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Gail S.
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Apr 03, 2010

It is easier to introduce a new cat to a multiple cat homeinstead of a single cat home. The cats in a multiple cat
home have already learned to share their space, whereas in asingular cat home the one cat has likely never had his territory challenged.

You are not a cat so your cats don't consider you to be a challenger to their territory. In fact most cats consider
their people to be parents or kittens and therefore not a threat to them in any area.

A male cat will probably accept a strange female cat more than another male. Another male cat is a challenger to his territory so if you are going to introduce another cat into your home try and choose a cat of the opposite sex.

It is much easier getting a male cat to accept a female than getting a female to accept a male cat. And if you have a younger cat with an older cat that has become set in its ways.

Again you must understand about the basic behavior of cats and watch for clues as to whether or not the cats will accept each other. Separate the two cats for a while from the beginning, and do not pay more or less attention to the new arrival than to the resident cat.

Cats do have a pecking order when they live together, and the more dominant cat will fight with the other to establish dominance. Understand that this is a natural process and some fighting is likely to happen unless they have grown up with each other and the pecking order has already been established. Testing of the pecking order still happens even then, just not as often. Understand that it is the same with cats, just a little more understated. The dominant cat has first rights to food and water. They have first rights to your attention.

And if they see that the other is trying to usurp these rights there will be a fight to make sure that the cat that
is not dominant knows where the lines are. Most of the time the cats won't injure each other, in fact it often looks
somewhat like they are playing with each other. Your cats will probably work things out on their own if you don't push them together. It can take weeks to months for two adult cats who are strangers to get chummy.

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Nancy C.
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Apr 03, 2010

If you have a dominant male and don't advise introducing another male cat unless you are up to the challange of fielding wicked "cat spats" on a daily basis. Your old boy will see any newcomer as a threat to his dominance (boy or girl) but a female may be seen as slightly less of a threat. Either way.....there will be spats. The main thing you need to do is respect your old guys feelings. He is secure in his home-role as "king" of the animal population and introducing a newcomer will shake his authority. You can do it but just ease into it. Don't expect your cat to be "best friends" with the newcomer right away. If you do it right they will get along in time. Just be patient and allways keep in mind that cats are fiercely independent creatures who play by their own rules.

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