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Q: How?

March 11, 2010 | By Ches21 | 8 answers | Expired: 1735 days ago

Ches21

How do you bathe a cat without the cat clawing you or trying to jump outta the tub?

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Jeanette G.
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Mar 22, 2010

I would say probably bathe him in the sink, or in a small container/ bowl. The cat may feel insecure or scared with water all around him and may feel like there is no way out. I would think (I'm not an expert) that petting the cat and soothing him before the bath to let him know that you care about him would help a great deal.
Get a small tub and put only a bit of water in the bottom. Be slow and do not force him into the bowl. Make sure not to have a lot of water running near him or a whole bunch of sounds, this might make him feel uneasy. you can lather the kitten up with tear free soap (perhaps baby shampoo?) and make sure though that he feels safe in your hands. Get all of the shampoo off of him so that it will not dry on his skin and irritate him. Rinse thoroughly.
Don't be quick or forceful, this will make him feel bad. Try talking to him when giving the bath and petting him. I would also try the shower thing. Let him go in the shower with u, and get used to water by his own free will.
(and get a couple of cute pics to share with us too ;-) )

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Nancy C.
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Mar 14, 2010

I owned a very unusual cat who loved baths. He would sit in the bath tub and wait for me to bathe him. When in the bath he was so happy and purring....playing with the water even. He was the only cat I ever saw who acted this way but he also adored human contact and was highly "vocal" around others. Weirdo but we loved him.

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Anonymous
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Anonymous

Mar 12, 2010

You got some good advice here. When Peak rolls in "dusty earth" (which he loves to do) I just wipe him with a damp rag to spruce him up again and to try to keep him from ingesting the dirt from licking it off. It's funny because he gets so into it if you pet him a little cloud of dust rises up. In a really bad situation they sell carrier bags with mesh sides that allows the water in while confining the cat a bit, which seems to quiet them. I imagine you could train them to do it without the bag after a while.

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Nancy C.
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Mar 11, 2010

Actual baths are just so stressful on cats...not to mention drying to their skin....which causes more dander, itchiness, and thus more allergies. A very good alternative is the bath wipes (many organic types are out now) or spray some "dry bath" on a cloth and wipe it throungh your cats coat. The cloth works well since I found my cats HATED the spray bottle sound and the feeling on their fur directly. If you must bathe the cat you should use a basin....not the bathtub.... and fill it with warm water before you bring your cat to it. Sometimes you can wrap your cat in a towel ( but some cats fear this) for extra protection. Make the bath a calm, quiet as possible, environment. Also lots of treats and love after the "bath experience" can help your cat feel a little better about it.

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stephanie a.
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Mar 11, 2010

I have a long haired cat that is not fond of baths. I use the waterless sprays that you can purchase at most pet stores to keep him clean. Also the petwipes, like baby wipes help to keep the cat clean and smellingn good. Good luck with your cat.

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Jillian
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Mar 11, 2010

practice. you start to learn how cats move when introduced to water and where your hands need to be to keep them there w/o getting scratched.
there are are few ways to lower them in: one hand on chest, the other securing their neck, but not too tightly; both hands on either side of their rib cage, but far away from their paws; one hand securing their front paws by locking around both and the other hand under their chest in a cradling fashion.
pick one that works for you and your cat.
once in the tub, which should only have a few inches of water in it {this will lessen the freak out moment}, secure them by the rib cage and/or back of the neck until they calm down a little. use you hand at first to get them wet by cupping water onto them and petting them so their fur absorbs it. normally, they'll struggle, but continue this way until they stop. you may never get to their point where you can use a cup, but that's alright. being right handed, i keep my left hand under their rib cage, up in their armpit, and use my right hand to wash them. you have to be alert and quick b/c when they struggle you want to get your right hand onto the back of their neck. you don't have to grab unless they're trying to jump out, but simply placing it there often makes cats stop or slow down. sometimes what works best is to keep one hand on the back of their neck the whole time and use the other hand to wash.
but like i said, practice. you're gonna get scratched at first so clip their nails beforehand, but allow them plenty of time to de-stress in between the clipping and the bath. i use to get scratched all the time, but it's been years since my last bath time scratching from an adult cat. so far i haven't figured out how to keep a kitten from scratching me!

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daryl b.
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Mar 11, 2010

i really think it depends on the cat. i had a cat theat no matter what would not scratch or bite. they would put her in the tub on a grater like thing that she could grip to. she had a choice let got and fall into the water or hang on. she was a good girl and hung on. this was not for a bath because as the other answer says they bathe themselfs all the time. but this was for fleas as she was on of my barn cats. someone stole her and when i found her i brought her home

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Josiesue02
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Mar 11, 2010

First off, youre really not supposed to bathe cats since they do that themselves but if you had to bathe the cat theres a couple options. The first thing i would try is, at the pet stores, they have wipes, i think theyre called between bath wipes or something, but theyre like baby wipes but specially for animals and you can just wipe the cat down with that. I have a long haired cat who sometimes starts to smell because after he goes in the kitty litter the dust sticks in his hair and i have used those on him. He doesnt really like it but its nowhere near as bad as a bath. The other option, they may still claw you but when i was younger i had a kitten, i tried to get her used to water and everynight when id take a shower id bring her in with me and she would hold onto me (sometimes with her nails) but seemed to be comforted that i was in there with her. But i would really go for the wipes.

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