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Q: How to get a High Kill Facility into a NO Kill Facility

March 2, 2009 | By Anonymous | 9 answers | Expired: 1961 days ago

Anonymous

Does anyone know how to get a high kill animal control facility into a no kill animal control facility??? There are soo many pets being put to sleep at our animal control and I was wondering how to change that. Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated!!

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Peggy A.
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Mar 11, 2009

Irresponsible pet owners are major contributors to the overabundance of abandoned animals. People think pets are disposable.....they're not as cute as when they were pups, kittens, foals, etc...... It's much like family values. Someone has to teach children how to take care of animals. Special classes should be offered for this purpose. I'd like to see our local shelter offer classes to teach children how to be responsible pet owners. Guess I'll suggest it!

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Anonymous
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Anonymous

Mar 10, 2009

I love animals to death, but with people not able to afford pets because of the economy and so many strays and unwanted animals, we almost need kill shelters. It's too expensive to keep all the unwanted animals fed and taken care of if no one can donate to the shelter and if no one is willing to adopt pets.

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Andrew D.
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Mar 08, 2009

I am in agreement with sogofox. Another way to get high kill shelters closed down is to appeal to your state Senators and Congressmen/women to open legislation regarding this situation. I have already sent a request to my state Senator regarding this issue.

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Sogofox
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Mar 06, 2009

I want to agree with Susan P. that Nathan Winograd is a very important thinker on this complex question right now. His website www.nokilladvocacycenter.org is a good resource as well.
However "onlybadowners" makes an important point as well. Improving the shelter is only part of the answer - the entire community must join in the solution by spaying/neutering, making sure pets have proper ID, being responsible owners and taking seriously their lifetime commitment to their pet.
And no-kill shelters often do exist in the same communities with high-kill animal control facilities. The no-kill shelters in that case are able to accomplish that title only by limiting admissions -- that means turning away animals.

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Onlybadowners
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Mar 03, 2009

A high kill shelter is also an open admission shelter. No kill shelters turn dogs away, those dogs end up dropped off at a high kill shelter or on the street and picked up by a county worker to go to a high kill shelter. The shelter runs out of room because they are the only outlet because the no-kills are full, and then they take the heat for the death of all the dogs. The real culprits are people who don't get their animals spayed or neutered, irresponsible breeders, and those who don't take their lifelong responsibility to their dog seriously.
The best way to turn a high kill into a no kill is to promote spay neuter programs to bring down overpopulation, regulate breeding in the community, start a foster program, and enlarge the facility.
No one enjoys killing dogs, and the people who make the decisions about which dogs get to live and which have to die deserve admiration and respect. In many cases, they are volunteers who give up their personal lives to work in the kennels everyday. They frequently have a closer relationship to the dog they just sentenced to death than anyone else. Please avoid blaming the shelter for the scale of the problem and its limited resources.

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Susan P.
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Mar 02, 2009

Sorry for that typo, his name is Winograd. www.nathanwinograd.com/ and that's his web site.

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Susan P.
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Mar 02, 2009

Nathan Winigrad is the leading expert on accomplishing this. Visit his web site and be shocked. He has done an amazing work and exposed the fraud of organizations that claim to protect animals. He has accomplished the goal of making shelters NO KILL in more than one location.

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RMGriffith
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Mar 02, 2009

It is probably a matter of resources. You can try to help set up a fostering program which will free up some space and buy the fostered animals some time.

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Sarah
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Mar 02, 2009

Volunteer, either at your local shelters, or at a local no-kill animal rescue. It takes a lot of work/resources to save every animal. No doubt your local shelters help as many animals as they can.

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