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Q: How do you know when your dogs are playing, or trying to hurt yoyu cause they're mad?

July 12, 2009 | By Marisa | 3 answers | Expired: 1853 days ago

Marisa

I am just wondering cause i have no clue..And i kinda wanna know..

Readers' Answers (3)
Applesauce82
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Jul 13, 2009

good question...one that i wish i knew the answer to...
my pup Oscar loves to play with us but sometimes we have to stop bc it seems like he is getting a little carried away with play time..lol....we dont know if this is just how he plays or what......

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Kerramello05
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Jul 13, 2009

Body language! A dog that is not playing will give off much different signals than one that is. Signs that your dog is not playing are: tense body posture, tail tucked between legs, low growl, ears back. (Not limited to just these).
It's really important to teach your puppy the rules of play from an early age. Normally they would learn their bite inhibition from their littermates. However, when you take a puppy out of that scenerio (especially if it's done too early), you could really end up with a lot of problems later on in life if you don't teach them that there are rules to playing. The first rule should always be NO BITING!!! Pups do a lot of nipping while playing with each other, and normally would let each other know when it gets to be too much and that's how they learn not to bite. A pup that uses biting while playing with you could end up in a dire situation if one day he / she does the same thing to a stranger, a child, etc. Teach your dog that biting means that play stops immediately.

Very Cute Puppy!! Good luck!

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Lherbertson
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Jul 13, 2009

I think you'll have to be more specific. A general answer to a general question is that it depends on the dog. Some dogs play rougher than others. And it depends on what game you are playing - tug and wrestling are rougher than fetch. If you started to get a vibe that it's no longer play, then it probably isn't. If you can't tell at all, it's best to avoid the rougher games. It's difficult to answer this question without knowing any details. Is the dog doing something in particular that makes you think he's not playing?

Another thing to try is to have set playtimes during the day. An hour in the morning after a walk, or an hour before dinner. Set a schedule so your dog knows to play during those times.

Also, you can end each play session with a word. "Enough" or "done". I use "okay" to let my dog know I'm done playing the game. Eventually the dog catches on.

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