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Q: How do I stop Chance from jumping up on us?

October 30, 2008 | By sandy | 15 answers | Expired: 2135 days ago

sandy

Anyone that walks in the house chance jumps on them to greet them. Then when I least exspect it he jumps on me. All the time

Readers' Answers (15)

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Denise T.
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Oct 30, 2008

The best way is to first, ignore him and tell your guests to ignore him when he jumps, petting or showing any type of acknowledgement back will only encourage the behavior. Second, you can also have him on a leash and step on it so he cannot jump when others arrive. Third, as with any type of training, it takes time and repetition. Good Luck!

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Gwen J.
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Oct 30, 2008

Tonya and Sherri are both correct, you should be actively training the dog for all expected behaviors and this one will fall into place, but ONLY IF YOU WORK on it! I have been teaching dog training for a couple of years now, and can always tell the students that do their homework because their dogs' behavior changes. The students that don't do their work think they can come to a class, learn one thing and never practice it at home.

Good luck! Let us know how it's going

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Marla W.
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Oct 30, 2008

Put him on a leash when people come over.When someone comes over step on the leash enough so he can't jump Tell him no. My mother did this and her dog is very good now.

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Anonymous
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Anonymous

Oct 30, 2008

The first step is to understand WHY she is jumping on you. All dogs are descended from the wolf. In a wolf pack the pups jump up to lick the mouth of the adult wolves to make them regurgitate left over food. When the pups get older, jumping up and licking the mouth no longer means give me food, it transfers over to an appeasement and greeting behavior. When the young wolf meets a more dominate wolf then itself it will go and lick its mouth to show it respect or to greet it. Your dog wants to be good and wants to greet you in the way she knows how, by licking your mouth. The problem is your mouth is 5 feet or more off the ground, hence the jumping. When your dog jumps on you it is only trying to get to your face to greet or appease you. The more you punish this behavior the more your dog will jump in order to try to make it up to you. Your dog is trying very hard to do things right and she doesn’t understand why you keep hurting her. We have to teach her a different way of greeting you and other people. Different cultures, different greetings. Different cultures have different ways of greeting each other. While Americans shake hands or nod their heads with a smile to greet people, the Màori tribe of New Zealand greet each other by offering a Hongi greeting. The Hongi greeting is where one presses ones nose to the other person’s nose and exchange the breath of life. If you were to visit this tribe and you held out your hand for a greeting and they went to touch our nose with theirs, there would be disgruntled feelings between both parties. Both parties where doing what they knew was proper greeting behavior, but the other party wasn’t familiar with that custom. Your dog only knows dog language. Your dog needs to be taught how to properly greet humans.
*Make sure your dog is getting plenty of exercise!
*Jumping equals ignoring. When you come home ignore the dog. No eye contact, no voice, no touch. You don’t have a dog when you come home. The dog will jump up on you; ignore it like she was never there. This may take up to 10 min. When your dog settles down and is calm, call her to you and pet her and tell her she is a good girl. If she goes to jump at this point stand up and walk away and ignore her again. When she is calm repeat the exercise. This will teach your dog that in order to get attention she needs to remain calm. This process works really well, but takes about 2 weeks for the dog to “get it”. Plan set up times to have other people come over to your house and do the same thing. This way your dog learns not to jump on other people as well.
*Sit for a treat. Another way is to teach your dog to sit for attention. You will need to leash your dog and get some yummy treats. Hook the leash to your dog and have someone ring the doorbell. Tell your dog to sit and stay. Start to open the door. If the dog breaks its stay close the door and start over. Once your dog can stay in a sit stay while the door is opened you can move on to the next step. Have your guest ignore the dog, no eye contact, no touch, no voice. Give the guest some treats to offer to the dog. Have the person start to approach the dog which is on a leash and in a sit stay. The guest can look at the dog at this point. If the dog breaks the sit stay by standing up or jumping the guest retreats and the owner puts the dog back in a sit stay. Redo the exercise until the guest can stand right in front of the dog. Offer the dog a treat at the face level of the dog and gently praise. This works negative and positive reinforcement. The dog wants the guest to approach her and to notice her. The negative reinforcement is the guest retreating and ignoring the dog. The positive reinforcement is when the guest is approaching and paying attention to the dog. The dog learns that sit staying will get the attention and a treat, and jumping or breaking the sit stay will cause the guest and the treat to leave. Practice makes perfect.
Dont encourge jumping up.

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Sherri R.
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Oct 30, 2008

Well that is an annoying problem but very easily solved with training. YOu can teach him a command like "off" and treat and praise him for listening. Working on basic commands on your own or in an obedience class is a great way to bond and teach acceptable behaviors. ALso,, keep a leash on him when people are coming over. Ask him to sit and stay (once he knows the comands) and praise him for not jumping.

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