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Q: Have you ever had an adoption go wrong?

January 6, 2009 | By Ro V. | 17 answers | Expired: 2010 days ago

Ro V.

I help many people after adoptions and there are times when, sadly, the wrong dog or cat was given to the wrong family. It's got to be one of the most heartbreaking things for me to see when people have to return the pet due to a serious problem (i.e. bite to child's face). Have any of you had this unfortunate situation happen to you and how did you deal with it?

Readers' Answers (17)

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janice b.
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Jan 14, 2009

i adopted a chihuahua ( poncho) from our local pound then found out he tries to bite company when they try to leave . give him back ? NO WAY ! I just have to try and help him to stop this behavior. by the way we are still working on this with no end in sight yet . i have faith he will quit some day.

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Dennis S.
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Jan 13, 2009

The difficulty any shelter will have is walking a line between being too easy and being too hard but instead finding that line in the middle. Do we want all adoptiond to work, absolutely; but until you can look into a persons heart and there minds there will be returns.

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gailsplace@verizon.net G.
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Jan 09, 2009

It's unfortunate but,it does happen in a shelter and also in rescue.Personally I've not had a child biting dog adopted out from the shelter or rescue.In rescue I will not adopt out a dog with NKH to people with children,especially small children.Overly cautious,maybe but,I'm just not comfortable.There will always be animals coming back to shelters and rescues for one reason or another but,you do the best you can with the information you have and I love my gut feeling also.

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SchnauzerFan
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Jan 08, 2009

Another adopter point of view here. We've had only one out of many go wrong. It was a dog at a town shelter, so they do not spend much time with the dogs and get to know them. I drove a couple hours to this facility, and brought my dogs with me to ensure they would get along. Everything seemed great but after the first couple days at home, the new dog was obviously very overwhelmed by our dogs trying to play nearby, even when not playing with him (even though he came from a home with multiple dogs). Then he began getting aggressive with us. If we led him somewhere on a leash, he was fine. But if you tried to lead him by putting your hand on his collar, he would try to bite us. I was quite willing to work through the issues, but after getting a very bad bite on my finger, my husband returned the dog while I was in the hospital. I was very upset but we do have to be careful because we have two boys and I do not want to ever risk them being bit. I am so glad I was the one who had been bitten. In the end, I think we just were not the right home for him.

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Azzurrapl
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Jan 08, 2009

I guess I have been very lucky with my shelter dogs. The only one that I was afraid about was 1 that I adopted when I was in college. My roommates and I went to the Local Shelter and asked what dog was going to be put down next. The man pointed to Charlie.... he was just a mutt - I asked him how old and why was he there - the man said he was about 4-5 years old and that he had run away from more house then they could keep track of. He was constantly getting adopted and then within a week getting picked up without collars and tags on. I wasn't sure he was the right dog for me - but my roommates and I had vowed to save a life that day so I adopted Charlie. I was afraid he would run away so I had him leashed to my wrist for days - when I had to get back to classes - my roommates and I took turns skipping classes so he would stay tied to some ones wrist..... even our male friends took turns. But Charlie never ran away and he was the favorite dog of Henderson Apts for the next 2 years. Charlie lived with me for another 15 years... he was a great dog.... Everyone who met him said how friendly he was - he went boating, fishing, played hockey in the backyard.... He was a Great Dog.... I still cry over him. He was a Great Friend!

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Donna J.
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Jan 08, 2009

Many years ago when I worked for a newspaper, someone called to put their cat in the paper to go to a good home. I thought a cat would be nice and keep my small dog company. Well, that was a wrong decision. Although not adopted for money, the cat was adopted (for one night). But, the cat didn't know me, was terrified of me and a dog was around, and as I was holding her to calm her from my dog's curiosity, she went violent and clawed my face pretty bad. I called the lady from the ad and told her to come get the cat, which she did. My co-workers convinced me to get a tetanus shot. I eventually adopted a kitty and that has worked out much better.

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Stime89
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Jan 07, 2009

I CAN GIVE A PERSPECTIVE OF THE ADOPTER. WE GOT A BLACK LAB PUPPY FROM A LOCAL SHELTER 2 YEARS AGO. IT TOOK A COUPLE OF WEEKS OF CONSTANT VET VISITS BEFORE WE FINALLY GOT SOMEONE TO TELL US THE TRUTH. THE LIGHT OF MY CHILDRENS EYES HAD HER IMMUNE SYSTEM STUNTED AT ABOUT 3 MONTHS OLD AND SHE COULDNT FIGHT ONFECTION AT ALL. WE ARE A POOR FAMILY AND WE DRAINED OUR SAVINGS TRYING TO HELP HER (WE NAMED HER HOPE) BUT SADLY WE COULDNT HELP HER. AFTER 5 WEEKS THAT WE HAD HER, AND 1200 DOLLARS IN VET BILLS, WE LOST HER.
IF THE VET THAT GAVE HER A CLEAN BILL OF HEALTH BEFORE WE ADOPTED HER HAD TOLD THE TRUTH, WE COULD HAVE SPENT THAT MONEY ON A PET THAT COULD HAVE BEEN WITH US FOR A LONG TIME.
I AM JUST GLAD THAT WE COULD GIVE HER 5 GOOD WEEKS BEFORE SHE LEFT US. RIP HOPE!

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Jodi R.
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Jan 07, 2009

No matter how much you screen a person, how much you question them, check their background etc, there are bound to be times when the adoption just doesn't work out. Its not always because the person is bad, sometimes behaviors come out in a home environment that are not noticeable in a shelter environment.

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nancy f.
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Jan 07, 2009

IT DOES NOT GO WRONG, BECAUSE WE ARE SO CAREFUL. ITS TOO EXPENSIVE TO MAKE A MISTAKE, ADOPTING A HORSE. YOU NEED TO BUILD A BARN, FENCE HAVE AT LEAST 1 ACRE PER HORSE, U NEED 2 HORSES, THEY DO NOT LIVE ALONE, YOU NEED EMERGENCY $$ FOR COLIC SURGERY, INSURANCE, RIDING SKILLS, TACK.... ITS ENDLESS... WE HAVE U LEASE THE HORSE FROM US BEFORE U BUY, THAT WAY U KNOW FOR SURE. NANCY

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Looking
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Jan 06, 2009

We adopted Radar, a 3 year old Jack Russell who had been on the streets for about 6 months before being taken to the shelter, and was at the shelter for a couple months before we adopted him. After we got him home, he turned out to be very aggressive, and was an escape artist. He would try to bite me when I would go outside looking for him, and we were concerned that he'd bite someone else. The shelter said we should return him & they would put him down. The vet recommended returning him to the shelter. I talked to several Jack Russell rescue people, and brought in a trainer, and we decided to keep him. With lots of love and attention, he turned out to be a wonderful pal. After he developed diabetes, he would only let me, or another woman, give him insulin shots; he would try to bite my husband. We had Radar for almost 8 years, and all in all, were glad we kept him.

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