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Q: Do lab/pit mixes make good pets?

May 28, 2009 | By Tonya | 10 answers | Expired: 1876 days ago

Tonya

I am adopting a 1 yr old lab/pit mix from the local pound. I get her next week, she is having surgery to be fixed beginning of next week.I visit her every day, she seems so lovable. She appears to be more lab than pit. Her owners just brought her in and left. There is no sign of abuse whatsoever. People say I am nuts getting a dog with any pit in it, no matter how little. What is everyone's take? People are making me nervous. She and I get along just fine. I know she needs to adapt to my home, my ways etc and also learn to like my cat. Should I be worried about all I read on pits? Does he lab part balance out the pit part? I already commited to her and am already in love with her. I probably shouldn't listen to people right? Ugh Help need advice :)

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Lori R.
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Jun 09, 2009

I am a American pit Bull Terrier Advocate. Please don't let other people's opinions influence your. Get the facts go to www.understand-a-bull.com for Pit Bull info. APBT's, American Bullies are great breeds. They are willing to do what you tell them. They do need training and direction just like any other dog. Please go to that website and read all the info. Good luck and best wishes. Check out my profile and my beautiful American Bullies/ APBT's.

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ashley
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May 29, 2009

Any dog can make a good pet. The only reason a dog could be "a bad pet" is by the owner. Dont listen to them people about pits. They just have a bad rep cuz of owners! Pit bulls are wonderful dogs. They obey real well and love to make there owner happy. So if some idiot tought a pit to fight another dog, the dog does it, and then the owner says good dog! What do u think the pit is thinkin. Its just how they were trained. And labs are great family dogs. Very playful. I have a black lab. I dont have a pit but my boyfriend has a pit and that dog is just a BIG BABY! His dog would never hurt anyone unless his family was getting hurt. Dont let stupid past owners of pit bulls scare u away from them. She will be a great dog!

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misty
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May 29, 2009

with any new pet, just take your time with her... you will be trying to get to know her & her habits, as she will also be trying to get know yours... just because she is a pitty, doesnt automaticly make her a bad dog... working in rescue, i have had several pits brought to me... Hope, was used as bait & was sent to me from the vet who literally put her back together... Hunny was found with rope tired all over her body, we were never able to find her puppies... & Chopper was found running the street with very infected ears after soemone had taken sissors or box cutter to them, to get him ready for the fight ring... even after all the abuse they were subjected to we found they were so very sweet... all got along with cats & dogs (except Hope, big dogs scared her, she would cower & piddle all over herself, if it was a little dog she was fine)... just go slow, show lots of love, but be firm & consistant... you will have a very loyal, loving, happy, well behaved girl...good luck with her...

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jessie
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May 29, 2009

any dog makes a good pet, it depends how he was raised, there are no bad dogs only bad owners

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Patricia  C.
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May 29, 2009

Lab/pit mixes make excellent pets. My nephew/sister has one and he is a wonderful dog. His name is Scooby and he spends a lot of time at my house and gets along well with all my dogs. Don't worry about the pit in him, it just makes him a more wonderful dog.

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Debby
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May 28, 2009

It's not the breed it is the trainer/ owner/ animal parent.. that makes the dog what they are. As far as the dog/ cat remember a slow introduction is the best.. allow them to know each other's presence but don't force introduction. The only issue with a pit /lab mix is the energy. They both are high energy dogs so plan alot of exercise and training. If you are not home make sure she is in a safe place like a kennel/ crate. They will chew anything and everything and you don't want anything to happen to your dog or your home. If you are not home during the day, I always recommend a heavy exercise regime in the morning, get the dog all tired out before you leave then it will sleep most of the day away.

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Midwestwoman
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May 28, 2009

Listen to people "with a grain of salt." I ask a lot of questions and hear a lot of opinions - the only way to gather information is to ask. But certainly don't believe everything everybody tells you. The important point you made here is that you're committed to this dog. That means you'll take the time to socialize her and train her and accept her and her unique personality.

Dogs are bred for their characteristics, be it physical, mental or both. They are bred for specific purposes in mind, if only to be lap warmers! I'm speaking of the toy breeds here - no offense to anyone, but they don't usually hunt, pull carts, guard or herd sheep, locate missing people or rescue people who are drowning. Unfortunately pit bulls have a history of being bred for fighting, originally bulls in England and later in this country, other dogs, selectively bred and "pitted" against each other by unscrupulous, blood thirsty gambling types.

But remember, the pit bull is also the beloved dog, Petey in the Little Rascals and the RCA dog! Buster Brown Shoes also had a pit bull in their logo! Many famous Americans have owned pit bulls: Mark Twain, Theodore Roosevelt, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Thomas Edison, Woodrow Wilson, John Steinbeck, Helen Keller, and Fred Astaire.

The important thing now is for you to learn all you can about your dog's individual personality and threshold levels for other dogs. That is, since the dog is one year old and has passed the critical socialization period, and it sounds like you don't have a lot of history on the dog, you are going to need to be very observant of your dog to see how she responds to people and other animals. If she shows other dog aggression, all is not lost, but you need to protect yourslef and the public by keeping her away form other dogs, or at a minimum closely supervising any itneraction, depending on how she does.

There is no way of predicting how much pit bull and how much lab is in your dog. She may have other breeds in her ancestrial background as well that aren't apparent. The only way to know is DNA testing, which will give you percentage ranges for each breed in your dog's genetic make-up. So, there's no way of accurately predicitng that the lab will balance out the pit and vice versa. What you're likely to see is some lab characteristics and pit bull characteristics in your dog.

And remember, dogs are individuals! Breed identification gives us some idea of what general characteristics to expect from a dog, but it isn't always an accurate indicator. For example, I have seen labrador retrievers that don't like the water!

The most important thing for you to do now is to find yourslef a positive reinforcement trainer to get your dog enrolled in either group lessons or private training, to read up on pit bull terriers and labs and study your individual dog to learn who she is and how she responds to her environment. Then you will be in the best position to set up her environment. experiences and your life together for the best success!

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Amber
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May 28, 2009

every "bully breed" dog i've ever met (mostly either Rottweilers or Pit Bulls) has been wonderful, probably because their owners were good people who love their dogs and not cruel dog-fighters. my brother-in-law and his wife found a dog that had been dumped in our area recently...the consensus was that the dog (female, about 8 months old) was a Chocolate lab / pit bull mix (something about the shape of her head), though she looked mostly Chocolate lab. they had her for a couple of months before they realized that *they* couldn't handle her...they didn't have the space (small apartment), or time, or money, or attention to devote to her, which we tried to tell them from the beginning, but...anyway, she was a really sweet dog. she just needed the right home, and now she's in a better home. based on this dog, i'd say be prepared for a high-energy dog that needs plenty to keep her busy, plenty of exercise, plenty of discipline & training, and plenty of love. any "second-hand" animal will have the wildcard of their past to affect their behavior, but if there's nothing in her appearance or behavior to make anyone think she's been abused, i don't think i'd be any more worried about your future-fur-baby than any other.

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Kavykeeper
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May 28, 2009

It's not about the breed. It's the way they are trained. Each breed has specific characteristics that give them specific advantages and abilities. Training them properly will result in a well behaved dog.

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krystal  p.
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May 28, 2009

pits really arent that bad, they are protective over their owners so if you have kids or gf/bf she will have to slowly adjust to them. labs are great dogs so the mix, in my opinion, will be a good dog. since shes only one she shouldnt have that much of a problem with the cat but labs do naturally chase cats so if that happens dont assume that it is the pit part. If i loved a dog i wouldnt really care what the majority of people say. one of the main reasons pits are mean are because they are breeded in alot of times to fight so it has become kind of a trait. with love and training i belive it will be fine.

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