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Q: Bird poisoning

January 28, 2009 | By Liz C. | 8 answers | Expired: 2044 days ago

Liz C.

Recently, the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture sanctioned the poisoning of hundreds of birds. The result was hundreds of birds dropped from the sky in Somerset County, NJ. If a local citizen did this on their own, they would undoubtedly have been charged with animal cruelty. Is this ok (i.e., HUMANE) just because the Govt. Ok'd it?

Readers' Answers (8)
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Chitown
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Jan 29, 2009

I, too, would like to know under what authority the federal government can conduct a mass poisoning to benefit apparently only one farmer. Agriculture is a huge, powerful lobby in our country. The USDA all too often is in service to the lobbyists of agribusinesses, at the expense of small farmers, the public, the environment,and animals.

Thumbs Up: 1 | Thumbs up!

Anne C.
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Jan 28, 2009

They are an invasive species... but then the reason was to keep them from a farm, likely not an organic native species establishment itself.

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Dstrykr
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Jan 28, 2009

Governed for the people by the people. They are no better than the average citizen. Indeed, they are public SERVANTS.

But the government sprays chemtrails almost daily on citizens of the U.S. and has a notorious history of spraying bio and chemicals on entire cities and populations, all which have been documented.

Why should this surprise us?

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

Denise L.
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Jan 28, 2009

This is very cruel & not to mention, unsafe! I'm sure that there are many predators that would eat these dead birds & end up dying fromt he poison...absolutely disgusting!

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lorraine B.
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Jan 28, 2009

from WKRG.com news 5

FRANKLIN, N.J. (AP) - U.S. Agriculture Department officials say
residents of Somerset County, New Jersey, should have seen the last
of the starlings dropping out of the sky.
Hundreds of birds fell dead onto roads and lawns over the
weekend after agriculture officials decided to eradicate a flock
that had become a nuisance for a farmer and posed a health threat
to his livestock.
Police and the county health department were notified that the
birds were to be poisoned, but homeowners were not. Many were
startled and alarmed. One local official says "it was raining
birds."
A USDA spokeswoman tells residents the poisoning was closely
monitored and the pesticide used was harmless to people and pets.
She says her agency will try to do a better job of informing the
public in the future.

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Debbie H.
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Jan 28, 2009

I'm reluctant to answer this question, as so much information is missing. First let me say that I do Not agree with the poisoning of birds regardless of who does it. However, there are times one must euthanize an animal say because it has rabies. As a general rule I'm against the euthanization of any animal, but occasionally, it is unavoidable. That being said; were these birds diseased? Were they spreading salmonella on the crops? To intelligently answer your question, I need more info. If the birds were ill and carring diseases to other birds, then yes, they needed to be destroyed. If it was because they were spreading salmonella, I'd hope they could find a alternative to killing the birds. What that might be; I don't know. But, I'm sure some expert in the field could come up with some answeres. If they were simply being annoying, killing them is DEFINITELY WRONG.

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Pia S.
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Jan 28, 2009

Yes, read M.S. Drambuie's journal of yesterday. She had a good thought on this. Terrible, isn't it?

Thumbs Up: 1 | Thumbs up!

Barbara S. R.
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Jan 28, 2009

WOW I HEARD ABPOUT THIS YESTERDAY AND DIDN'T REALIZE IT WOULD HAPPEN SO SOON. CREEPY

Thumbs Up: 0 | Thumbs up!

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