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Q: Barking?

February 6, 2013 | By Ches21 | 3 answers | Expired: 558 days ago

Ches21

Shasta is most likely our dog permanantly but there is a problem barking she will bark at the noises outside she is a country dog so she is not use to the city noises I have tried a spray bottle that doesn't work all I have found that works is saying in a firm vioce Shasta quit and then when she is quiet giving her a reward but I would like to figure out some other ways since Shasta needs to lose some weight also she will have to find a new home if the barking doesn't stop that isn't my choice it's the rest of the family but everyone is willing to help me in any way neccassary to keep her also when she barks Abby thinks she has to bark too and Abby was very well behaved before Shasta moved in here and began the barking at anything and everything any suggestions?

Readers' Answers (3)
Kelly
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Feb 07, 2013

Try getting her attention by clapping your hands, whistling, or shaking a can of coins or metal washers when she starts barking. Once she is quiet, redirect her attention to something that is rewarding like a toy or treat. Don't comfort, pet, hug, or feed her when she is barking as that will reinforce the behavior.After getting her attention, practice basic commands, like sit and down to redirect her focus. It's a good time to start training her with the "speak" and "quiet" commands too. Always use the same word for your commands. For the speak command, "speak", "talk", "bark" are all good choices. For the "quiet" command, you can use "quiet", "hush", "enough" or some other simple synonym. The commands should be simple, easy to remember, and used consistently. First work on the "quiet" command. Since dogs do use their barks to alert us to things, always check when she barks. Look out the window or in the area she's barking towards to make sure there's nothing she should be barking at. The last thing you want to do is to ignore or try to redirect a legitimate alert. If it's not legitimate, redirect her with your clap, whistle, to shaken can of coins. As soon as she stops barking use your chosen "quiet" command in in a very firm, but upbeat (not scolding) voice while rewarding her with a treat. (You can use small pieces of baked chicken or something similar as a treat if you're worried about her weight.) Practice the command each and every time she barks. It may take a few weeks for her to totally get it. Once she understands the "quiet" command you can start on the "speak" command. Teaching her to speak on command will actually help keep her from barking when you don't want her to which is why you should teach both commands. You'll have to find what is going to cause her to bark. Sometimes it's food, sometimes it's ringing the doorbell or knocking on the door. With food, you show the treat and using a happy, chirpy voice say "speak" (or whatever your command is.) When she finally speaks, give the treat and lots of praise. Practice a few times and then try it with just the command and no treat. If not using food as a stimulus, give your command and immediately ring the doorbell, knock on the door, or whatever will elicit a bark. As before, reward her behavior when she responds appropriately. It will take time for her to learn but she will. Once she's got the "speak" command down you can use the two commands together by asking her to speak a few times and then giving her the command to be quiet. When she has it down, she should only bark on command most of the time unless there is truly something she needs to alert you to. Even if she sometimes barks for no reason, you'll have her "quiet" command ingrained so it will be easier to get her to be quiet if those occasions crop up. You have to be persistent and consistent. Practice often, use liberal praise, and be patient. Remember that rewards and praise have to be immediate and rewards have to be worth obeying your commands to receive so use something she loves.

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daryl b.
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Feb 06, 2013

i would think that when she gets used to it she will stop if you can hang on that long. good luck ches

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Anonymous
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Anonymous

Feb 07, 2013

I've never known of an Eskie who didn't love to bark. That's the number one reason so many of them end up in shelters. Barking is just in their genes and it's impossible to change genetics. Eskies are working dogs and the barking is probably because she is doing her job of protecting her household. She's warning you of something so acknowledge what she's doing by checking it out first of all. Then tell her that 'it's okay' to let her know that she's done her job. You definately need to train her to the quiet command. Kelly's suggestions are spot on. I've known people who used the soda can filled with several pennies as an attention-getter. It works. Put tape over the hole so the pennies don't spill out. It is very important to be consistent in your command usage. Pick a word and stick to it. Make everybody in the family use the same word and make sure they all know the protocol for the training so it is consistent. ANd make sure you carry the can with you everywhere so you'll have it wherever she starts barking. Eskies need a firm leader because of their nature, which is to run the show. They are also working dogs that need a job and need lots of exercise. I think this is the dog with hip problems, if I remember correctly, but she still needs exercise. Check with your vet and online for "hip dysplasia exercise programs" and get her on an appropriate program. The more appropriately active she is, the less pent-up energy she has to bark at everything.

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